India to seek more teeth for Interpol at Rome meet

October 20, 2012

The Times of India on October 20, 2012 released the following:

By: Vishwa Mohan, TNN

“NEW DELHI: With the 26/11 Mumbai terror attack mastermind and LeT founder Hafiz Saeed and his ilk in mind, India will ask Interpol member countries to make the global police body more effective in terms of honouring pending Red Corner Notices (RCNs) against fugitives, including terrorists.

India’s demand and concerns will be articulated by the home minister Sushil Kumar Shinde, who will attend the Interpol General Assembly session to be held in Rome from November 5 to 8.

Hafiz Saaed alias Syed Hafiz Saab has not only been roaming free in full public view in Pakistan ever since the Interpol Notice was issued against him at India’s behest in 2009, but also been provided security by state authorities within the country.

“Saeed’s case makes a mockery of the RCN system which expects a member country to put the fugitive under arrest. It, therefore, prompts New Delhi to flag the issue at the gathering in Rome, seeking more power for the international police body,” said an official, who is engaged in finalizing details of Shinde’s visit.

Shinde is proposed to seek more teeth for the global police body in the ministerial meeting, which is to be part of the Interpol’s 81st General Assembly.

The matter, besides other issues including concerns over cyber crime and circulation\printing of fake currency notes, will be highlighted during the General Assembly meetings by the Indian delegation, consisting of senior officers of home ministry and CBI.

At present, the Interpol has 190 member countries, including Pakistan. Justice, security and home ministers from over 100 countries will participate in the General Assembly which is to be opened, for the first time, with a ministerial meeting.

Though over 160 Interpol RCNs are pending against fugitives wanted by Indian law enforcement agencies, New Delhi is specifically concerned about over 45 terrorists who are suspected to be holed up in Pakistan. Besides Saeed, the list includes 1993 Mumbai terror attack mastermind Dawood Ibrahim, hijackers of IC-814 flight, members of Indian Mujahideen, LeT and Khalistani terrorist groups.

Those who are not in public view may give Pakistan a benefit of doubt as the country never accepts their presence within its territory. “But, the presence of Saeed marks the ineffectiveness of the Interpol institutional arrangement where majority of the member countries consider Red Corner Notice to be a valid request for provisional arrest,” added the official.

Case of four Iranians, wanted in connection with the February 13 bomb attack on an Israeli diplomat’s car here, is also a concern for Indian agencies that had got RCNs issued against them in March.

Though Tehran has promised New Delhi to cooperate in the probe, Indian agencies are skeptical of Iran’s effort to trace four of its nationals. These four suspects are: Mohammadreza Abolghashemi, Houshang Afshar Irani, Seyed Ali Mahdiansadr and Masoud Sedaghatzadeh.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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EURO 2012 INTERPOL interview with Lieutenant Colonel Rafal Lysakowski

June 11, 2012

INTERPOLHQ published on YouTube on June 9, 2012 the following:

UEFA European Football Championship safety an INTERPOL priority

To assist local police authorities in making the 2012 UEFA European Football Championship in Ukraine and Poland as safe as possible for the players, officials and thousands of expected spectators, two INTERPOL Major Events Support Teams (IMESTs) have been deployed to the two host countries to help detect potential threats of terrorism, hooliganism and serious crime and to facilitate the real-time exchange of key police information to secure their borders.

Composed of experienced specialized police officers and highly trained operational assistants, the two IMEST teams were put in place ahead of the opening of the event (8 June — 1 July), to help make critical data accessible to key security officials in the two host countries.

The IMEST teams will help local police forces secure the four-week event by facilitating access to INTERPOL’s secure network which permits the exchange of vital police data such as fingerprints, images, stolen identity documents and wanted person profiles with all 190 INTERPOL member countries, allowing police in the field to quickly identify potential criminals.

“The 2012 UEFA European Football Championship is not exclusively a Ukrainian and Polish event. From a security standpoint, it is an international event, with all the security risks that entails,” commented Michael O’Connell, Director of Operational Police Support at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters in Lyon, France.

“The safety of thousands of fans over the next four weeks is INTERPOL’s current top priority, which is why the INTERPOL IMEST teams will be there throughout the event to provide operational support to national law enforcement authorities, along with the INTERPOL National Central Bureaus in Warsaw and Kiev,” O’Connell added.

With thousands of visitors travelling to Poland and Ukraine during the tournament, ensuring security is the top priority for local law enforcement, as terrorists and other international criminals might try to use falsified, stolen or lost passports to conceal their identities and enter the country to engage in criminal activities.

To counter this threat, IMEST staff in Kiev and Warsaw will be able to process and check thousands of identity profiles with instant, direct access to INTERPOL’s Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) database, which contains information on more than 32 million travel documents reported as lost or stolen by 163 countries and enables immigration and border control officers to ascertain the validity of a suspect travel document in seconds.

To date, some 70 IMESTs have provided support to countries across the world. INTERPOL is also preparing to deploy an IMEST to London to boost security at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

In addition to the deployment of IMEST teams, INTERPOL will also be supporting the UEFA event through its coordination of Operation SOGA — short for ‘soccer gambling’ — targeting illegal football gambling across Southeast Asia.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

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Fighting to Keep World Sports a Fair Game

April 24, 2012

The New York Times on April 24, 2012 released the following:

“By ROB HUGHES

LYON — In ancient Greek mythology, Hercules had to slay the multiheaded serpent-like Hydra, guardian of the underworld, although each time a head was cut off, two others would grow in its place.

In modern sports, it can seem that the authorities face a similar and equally herculean task in the global fight against illegal sports betting and match-fixing.

Michel Platini, the head of UEFA, the governing body of European soccer, which runs the richest sports club tournament in the world, the Champions League, has called illegal betting the greatest danger to the game, “the one that can kill football.”

Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee, goes even further.

“Sport is in danger,” Rogge said. “It’s not about the Olympics, it’s not about the Games, it’s about sport in general. Illegal betting in sport generates a turnover of around $140 billion a year, and it is inevitable that the Games will be sullied.”

According to the World Lottery Association, an organization of state-authorized lotteries, €90 billion, nearly $120 billion, is spent each year in legitimate wagers on soccer games. The same group estimates that another €90 billion is spent in illegitimate soccer betting. But Interpol, the international police organization, estimates have put the figure much higher.

While the problem of match-fixing in soccer has existed for decades, it appears to have intensified in recent years, aided by the Internet. Concerned by this apparent surge, international soccer authorities and law enforcement officials joined forces last year in their struggle to combat rampant match-fixing by what they describe as sprawling networks of organized crime based in Singapore, Malaysia and elsewhere in Southeast Asia.

FIFA, world soccer’s governing body, pledged $20 million in May 2011 to create a unit within Interpol in Singapore dedicated to rooting out match-fixing in Asia.

Noboru Nakatani, until recently the special adviser to the head of Japan’s National Police Agency, is moving to Singapore this month to oversee the research and development facility.

The unit aims to develop a program for officials, players and administrators that warns against match-fixing and alerts them to how it dishonors the game and might ruin their careers.

Ronald K. Noble, secretary general of Interpol, has said that gambling on sports “might seem as harmless as placing a small bet on your favorite team.”

But these operations, he notes, are often controlled by “organized criminals who frequently engage in loan sharking and use intimidation and violence to collect debts.” He added, “If that doesn’t work, they force their desperate, indebted victims into drug smuggling and into prostitution.”

Rogge has suggested that athletes must be educated about corruption, and that education is needed worldwide to instill knowledge about how and where to prevent the betting and fixing cases that have become prevalent in a number of sports, including soccer, cricket, and even sumo wrestling.

Education is the task that Fred Lord, who spent 10 years on undercover missions to crack covert police corruption in his native Australia, is undertaking at Interpol. His department, the Interpol Integrity in Sports program, is headed by Michaela Ragg, a former German federal police officer, and advises sports bodies on how to spot criminality before it festers and grows.

“I’m not a soccer expert,” Lord said. “My skills were in undercover policing. Policemen aren’t out there looking for match-fixers, they’re looking for terrorists or organized criminals.”

Because behind the so-called sporting corruption, Lord suggests, the authorities often find crime syndicates using sports for anything from money laundering to entrapment.

A key player in the fight against corruption in sports, Interpol, which is based in Lyon, in southern France, does not actually make arrests itself. It acts as a liaison between the law-enforcement agencies of its 190 member countries, providing communications and database assistance. Its data include 140,000 fingerprints, 110,000 DNA samples, 170,000 wanted criminals, and records of 32 million missing passports or ID cards.

But Noble, the Interpol secretary general since 2000, can send advisers to potential trouble spots at the request of member countries, as he did with 60 officers dispatched to assist South African border police in preventing known criminals from entering the country during the 2010 soccer World Cup.

Similarly, while London will police the Olympic Games this summer with the assistance of the British government and Metropolitan Police and the military, Interpol will deploy a team of specialists to help to check the passport details of everyone entering the country through the period of the Games.

Interpol has had some successes against international betting rings, as have other police forces. In recent years, operations involving the police in China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Macao, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam broke up major rings.

In South Korea last month, prosecutors said 16 professional volleyball players and two baseball players had been indicted in connection with match-fixing schemes.

In Italy, officials have made a number of arrests in recent months in connection with an ongoing investigation into match-fixing and illegal betting on soccer games. Several players have been among those arrested.

Although this investigation has for now not indicated links to Asian syndicates, the reach and resistance of the Hydra-like criminal networks is extensive and difficult to defeat.

A 2008 double murder in Newcastle, England, is a case in point. A young man and young woman, former university students from China, were murdered. The throat of Zhen Xing Yang was cut; the skull of his girlfriend, Xi Zhou, was smashed in three places. Before he died, investigators said, Yang was tortured.

The convicted murderer, an illegal immigrant from China named Guang Hui Cao, refused to give a motive for his crime. But detectives unearthed evidence that the victims were both involved with an Asian gambling ring that was relying on advance tips to bet on English soccer matches.

The two victims had apparently been recruiters acting for a Chinese syndicate that bet heavily on minor-league soccer games in the north of England. By exploiting a time lapse of one or two minutes between the play and the satellite broadcast in Asia, the police testified, the syndicate could place a winning bet on the next goal, throw-in, corner or free kick before they appeared to happen.

The culprit was arrested and sentenced to more than 30 years in prison. British detectives found no evidence linking him to soccer betting, but they did uncover plenty to implicate the victims. They have since said that, for want of resources, they have had to close the case.

Detectives had visited China but ran up against a wall of silence. The murderer maintains his silence behind bars, and some residents of Newcastle maintain theirs, too. Journalists and investigators of corruption in sports in general have often encountered a similar silence, even from informants hired to advise sports at the highest levels.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol chief says countries not using databases

January 20, 2012

Deseret News on January 19, 2012 released the following:

“By Paisley Dodds, Associated Press

LONDON — Interpol’s chief sounded an alarm Thursday that countries are still failing to check identity documents against its database — a warning that comes just months before the 2012 Olympics.

Ron Noble, secretary-general of the international police agency based in France, said out of the 1.1 billion travelers last year, ID documents of about 500 million people were not checked against Interpol’s database, which is one of the world’s most detailed.

“It will take a tragedy — a specific kind of tragedy — for behavior to change,” Noble told The Associated Press after speaking to foreign correspondents in London.

Noble has said Britain is the only EU country to systematically check passports against those registered with Interpol as missing worldwide. Britain carried out 140 million checks last year against the database — more than the rest of Europe combined.

Last year, he said more than 11,000 people were caught trying to enter the U.K. using lost or stolen passports.

France carried out the second-highest number of checks at 10 million.

A special Interpol team will be sent specifically for the Olympics, helping British authorities determine whether anyone trying to enter the U.K. is wanted, whether their documents have been listed as lost or stolen and whether they are considered a threat.

He said the team will be smaller than the one Interpol sent to South Africa for the 2010 World Cup — an event where teams were at border crossings and airports.

“We know terrorists use fraudulent ID documents,” Noble said.

The U.K. Border Agency faced intense criticism last year after passport checks were relaxed during the height of the summer tourist season to lessen lines at London’s Heathrow Airport, Europe’s busiest. A government report on Thursday blamed poor communications, a lack of supervision and other shortcomings for the problems.

Olympics security has been a primary concern since 1972, when 11 Israeli athletes and coaches were killed at the Munich Games.

Noble said while there was no specific intelligence that the games would be targeted, such events provide an array of opportunities for criminals, including pickpocketing, forced prostitution, illegal Internet betting rings and hoaxes.

And then there is still the threat of terrorism. Noble said while al-Qaida’s ranks had been depleted, affiliates were actively recruiting in places like Somalia.

Another fear that Noble said “keeps him up at night” is the threat of a nuclear or biological attack. Interpol has been alerted to some 2,715 instances where there were questions of whether there had been illicit trafficking of nuclear material.

Noble stressed, however, that didn’t mean there were more 2,000 cases of trafficked nuclear material.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Exclusive: Interpol chief – close EU border loophole or risk attack

January 1, 2012

FOCUS News Agency on December 30, 2011 released the following:

“London. A glaring failure by almost all European countries to check passports against an international database of lost and stolen travel documents is leaving the Continent vulnerable to a terrorist attack on the scale of the Madrid train bombings, the head of Interpol has warned, Independent reported.
In what he said he hoped would not be his “last interview”, Interpol’s Secretary General, Ronald Noble, told The Independent that nearly all EU members are failing to make crucial checks against the agency’s database of 15 million suspicious passports – allowing potential terrorists to enter Europe and cross multiple borders undetected.
“So many basic steps aren’t being taken, which could lead to another September 11, another July 7 [the 2005 London Underground bombings], another March 11 in Madrid,” Mr Noble said.
Speaking almost two decades after a terrorist used a stolen Iraqi passport to enter the US and bomb the World Trade Centre, killing six people and injuring 1,042, he added: “The lesson that should have been learnt… is that people carrying stolen travel documents, if they are not stopped, can enter your country and mastermind a horrible attack.”
The former head of the US Secret Service also revealed that last year 500 million flights were not screened against the Interpol database. “My hope is that it won’t take another September 11, July 7 or March 11, where someone enters one of these countries carrying a stolen passport and masterminds a terrorist attack, before all countries begin systematically screening passports,” he said.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International

Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices

listed above.