Interpol ‘red notices’ up 62 percent

January 21, 2012

UPI.com on January 19, 2012 released the following:

“MOSCOW, Jan. 19 (UPI) — The number of “red notices” issued by Interpol rose more than 62 percent in 2011 to 26,000 compared with 2010, Interpol’s chief said Thursday.

Ronald Noble, the chief of the international commission, said red notices, which request the arrest of wanted persons with a goal of extradition, climbed from 16,000 in 2010, RIA Novosti reported.

At the same time, the number of “diffusions” — informal arrest warrants placed on Interpol’s communications system — increased by 15,000, to 49,000, or about 44 percent.

Overall, the number of Interpol notices increased to 75,000, or 50 percent.

In the past 11 years, the number of people wanted by Interpol has increased nearly six-fold.

The operations of Interpol, whose full name is the International Criminal Police Commission, have become much more public, Noble said. In 2000, 95 percent of its notices were issued secretly, compared with fewer than half its notices today.”

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Illicit Trafficking of Nuke Materials Documented: Interpol Chief

January 16, 2012

Arirang.co.kr on January 15, 2012 released the following:

“The head of Interpol says his organization has documented illicit trafficking of nuclear materials in more than 2,500 cases.
In a written interview with the Seoul-based Yonhap News Agency, Interpol chief, Ronald Noble, said Sunday that Interpol is sharing the data with its 1-hundred-90 member nations to better combat threats of nuclear terror worldwide.
Saying that a great calamity will ensue if terrorists obtain nuclear materials, Noble stressed the importance of cooperation among nations.
Interpol will attend the 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit, slated for March 26 through the 27th.
Ahead of the Seoul summit, Noble is set to attend a preparatory meeting in New Delhi this coming Monday and Tuesday.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Exclusive: Interpol chief – close EU border loophole or risk attack

January 1, 2012

FOCUS News Agency on December 30, 2011 released the following:

“London. A glaring failure by almost all European countries to check passports against an international database of lost and stolen travel documents is leaving the Continent vulnerable to a terrorist attack on the scale of the Madrid train bombings, the head of Interpol has warned, Independent reported.
In what he said he hoped would not be his “last interview”, Interpol’s Secretary General, Ronald Noble, told The Independent that nearly all EU members are failing to make crucial checks against the agency’s database of 15 million suspicious passports – allowing potential terrorists to enter Europe and cross multiple borders undetected.
“So many basic steps aren’t being taken, which could lead to another September 11, another July 7 [the 2005 London Underground bombings], another March 11 in Madrid,” Mr Noble said.
Speaking almost two decades after a terrorist used a stolen Iraqi passport to enter the US and bomb the World Trade Centre, killing six people and injuring 1,042, he added: “The lesson that should have been learnt… is that people carrying stolen travel documents, if they are not stopped, can enter your country and mastermind a horrible attack.”
The former head of the US Secret Service also revealed that last year 500 million flights were not screened against the Interpol database. “My hope is that it won’t take another September 11, July 7 or March 11, where someone enters one of these countries carrying a stolen passport and masterminds a terrorist attack, before all countries begin systematically screening passports,” he said.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International

Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices

listed above.


Azerbaijan General Prosecutor’s Office expands cooperation with Interpol

October 7, 2011

ABC.az on October 7, 2011 released the following:

“Baku, Fineko/abc.az. The General Prosecutor’s Office of Azerbaijan is broadening co-operation with Interpol.

The GPOA reports that country’s prosecutor general Zakir Garalov has had a meeting with Interpol’s secretary general Ronald Noble.

During the meeting Garalov told the guest about the measures taken to modernize the judicial system, reforms in the legal and regulatory framework, and measures taken to ensure rights and freedoms of citizens.

He informed the Interpol secretary general of the importance of the decision in accordance with international legal norms and principles of the global problems posed by the cultivation, production and distribution of narcotic substances in the territories of Azerbaijan occupied by Armenia, danger of nuclear technology contraband for the countries of the region, creation of illegal paramilitary terrorist groups by separatists at the expense of dirty money received from sale of narcotics.

Mr. Noble, in turn, expressed satisfaction with cooperation with the GPOA, appraised the reforms in the judicial system, particularly in the fight against crime and better protection of human rights, etc.

The parties also discussed issues of fight against crime and detention of perpetrators with following bringing to justice and other matters of mutual interest of the sides.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Battle to extradite Rwanda fugitives rages on

October 3, 2011

The East African on October 2, 2011 released the following:

“By A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT, The EastAfrican

Rwanda is coming under renewed global pressure to craft new strategies to arrest wanted genocide suspects from their hide outs ahead of next year’s UN court deadline.

Seventeen years after the 1994 genocide, at least 65 of the key masterminds remain at large despite efforts to track down genocide fugitives.

Concern is mounting ahead of the 2012 deadline when the mandate of the Arusha based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) — the UN court set up to deal with the atrocities — expires.

Nine of the most wanted genocide masterminds remain at large, with a bounty of $5 million each on their head under the US Rewards for Justice Programme since 2004.

Despite the incentive, some of the most wanted suspects remain untouched; notable among them is Felicien Kabuga, an alleged financier of the Rwanda genocide who has been rumoured to be hiding in Kenya.

Only 32 fugitives have been arrested by Interpol out of the over 97 red notices (arrest warrants) issued.

“It’s a huge problem.

They also have access to resources that allow them to hide from capture. But just to remind you; it took 10 years to track down Osama bin Laden,” said Ronald Noble, the Secretary General of Interpol, adding there was a need for a new strategy to fast track the arrest of the fugitives who have become “more elusive.”

“The fugitives usually move under false names and travel documents to evade arrest with 10 genocide suspects so far arrested with false documents,” he said. However, the Interpol chief observed that with increasing regional and cross-border cooperation among countries, progress has been made towards limiting the movements of the fugitives, citing recent arrests of genocide fugitives in Uganda and DRC.

However, Rwanda is on the verge of achieving a major breakthrough as several European countries holding fugitives have finally looked into the possibility of extraditing the suspects to face trial in Rwanda.

Among countries Rwanda has been involved in a long-standing debate with requests to have suspects extradited home are France, Sweden, Norway, Finland, the Netherlands and Denmark.

The argument has been that Rwanda does not have competent courts to accord extradited individuals a fair trial, a claim Rwanda dismisses.

“We have always been ready. Our position is clear, we are ready to take on these cases,” Rwanda’s Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga said.

Several requests, including some to the Arusha-based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), have been turned down in the past on the same grounds. However, earlier this year, some countries including Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden and the ICTR itself, began to give in, agreeing to the argument that Rwanda has made some major reforms in the judiciary and can try some of these cases.

Norway has said it would extradite Charles Bandora, a genocide suspect who roamed several African countries before ending up in the Scandinavian country, but he appealed the decision in the European Human Rights Court (EHRC), which is yet to decide.

The Netherlands on the other hand has appreciated several reforms in the justice sector, some of which it finances, but it is yet to extradite any of the several suspects in Dutch jails. It will all depend on the EHRC.

The same is the case with Sylvere Ahorugeze in Sweden.

But then, just as Rwanda braces itself for the first ever extraditions from a European country, human rights watchdogs including Human Right Watch (HRW), Amnesty International and the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI) are opposing the development. The groups have argued before the Strasbourg-based European court that Rwanda does not yet have a judiciary that is independent enough to accord the fugitives a fair trial.

“In theory, Rwanda is reforming its judiciary, but in practice those measures are still insufficient,” Carina Tertsakian from Human Rights Watch told the International Justice Tribune.

Ms Tertsakian, whose work permit was cancelled in April last year by Rwanda immigration authorities, and the representatives of Amnesty International and CHRI argue that the trials of the suspects risk being “politicised,” once transferred to Rwanda.

Mr Ngoga, however, dismissed the allegations, instead accusing the rights group of attempting to derail a process that was reaching a “promising stage.”

Mr Ngoga insists that organisation such as HRW, which has had a number of run-ins with the Rwandan government and Amnesty International, are determined to frustrate efforts to ensure justice takes its course.

“These organisations are always ready and opportunely present to oppose every initiative that would bring back to Rwanda genocide fugitives,” Mr Ngoga said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Monaco Minister Briefed on Joint Successes During INTERPOL Visit

July 26, 2011

INTERPOL on July 26, 2011 released the following:

“LYON, France – Minister of State for Monaco, Michel Roger was briefed on recent law enforcement successes involving the Principality and other INTERPOL member countries during his visit today to the world police body’s General Secretariat headquarters in Lyon.

During discussion with the country’s highest ranking government official, INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble highlighted the organization’s Project Pink Panthers as an area where Monaco has made a significant contribution to successful global law enforcement cooperation.

The project, created in 2007, centralizes information relating to hundreds of suspected international jewel thieves linked to more than 300 robberies in 27 countries since 1999, with the value of stolen jewellery estimated at more than EUR 350 million and has already let to arrests across the globe, including in Monaco.

Other recent successes include the recovery by Italian carabinieri of a number of high value paintings stolen from Monaco thanks to their inclusion in INTERPOL’s Stolen Works of Art database by the National Central Bureau in Monte Carlo.

With the origins of INTERPOL rooted in the first International Criminal Police Congress organized and held in Monaco in 1914, the possibility of Monaco hosting the 2014 INTERPOL General Assembly, to mark a century of international law enforcement cooperation was also discussed.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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