“Bahamas hosts INTERPOL programme to enhance fight against organized crime in the Americas”

May 10, 2013

INTERPOL on May 10, 2013 released the following:

“NASSAU, Bahamas – The latest session in a three-year programme coordinated by INTERPOL to boost national law enforcement’s ability to fight drugs trafficking and organized crime across the Americas has opened in Nassau, Bahamas.

Some 21 law enforcement officials involved in investigations into illicit drugs and transnational organized crime from across Central America and the Caribbean (Anguilla, The Bahamas, Belize, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Jamaica, Montserrat and Nicaragua) are taking part in the two-week (6 – 17 May) programme, organized by INTERPOL’s Capacity Building and Training Directorate.

“The launch of this training initiative here in the Bahamas, is another clear indication of INTERPOL’s commitment to capacity building in police forces worldwide,” said Commissioner of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Mr Ellison Greenslade.

“It fulfills an urgent need to further sensitize and train police officers and law enforcement partners to effectively deal with emerging global threats such as trafficking in persons, human smuggling, trafficking in illicit goods, weapons and drug trafficking, counterfeiting, money laundering, and a long list of other crimes,” added the Commissioner.

Welcoming the participants, Minster of National Security Dr Bernard J. Nottage said, “You have come here to receive hands on training in practical ways to harness and develop your skills for taking action against the insidious threat to our way of life from drugs and organized crime and from the evils they bring in their wake: violence, crime, corruption, the breakdown of family life and the destruction of young people.”

INTERPOL’ s Director of Training and Capacity Building, Dale Sheehan highlighted that the over-reaching goal of the three-year programme, launched in 2011, was sustainability and that successes had already been achieved.

“Through strong training and capacity building standards developed by our programmes, we have already seen an impact on the ground, with those who have benefitted having already gone out and trained some 1,600 other law enforcement officers in the past year alone. This is sustainability,” said Mr Sheehan.

Agencies taking part in this training include the US Drug Enforcement Administration, the Caribbean Customs Law Enforcement Council, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the Regional School for Anti-drug Intelligence of the American Community, in addition to specialists from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the National Police of Colombia.

As part of a combined approach the programme is running bilingually in Spanish and English, with all participants contributing their professional knowledge in core subjects. Participants include drugs and organized crime investigators from specialized law enforcement agencies, customs officials, prosecutors and INTERPOL National Central Bureau officials involved in police communications.”

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“INTERPOL to host largest-ever gathering of Ministers to address contemporary violence issues”

November 2, 2012

INTERPOL on November 1, 2012 released the following:

“ROME, Italy – INTERPOL’s General Assembly will bring together Justice, Home Affairs and Security Ministers from some 110 countries for the largest ever such gathering, which will focus on criminal violence issues ranging from human trafficking to terrorist activities.

The Ministerial meeting, which marks the beginning of the four-day (5 – 8 November) conference in Rome, Italy with the theme ‘Challenges for Police Facing Contemporary Violence’ will bring to the table senior government officials from around the globe.

INTERPOL’s Secretary General Ronald K. Noble stated, “This unprecedented gathering of ministers combined with our General Assembly will provide strong support for greater global cooperation in confronting ever-increasing and wide-ranging violent criminal activities.

“Transnational criminal violence is expanding, profiting from developments in technology and international economic challenges. Reduced budgets for law enforcement in far too many nations necessitates even greater levels of mutual support across borders in our continued efforts towards a safer world,” concluded the INTERPOL Chief.

A joint Ministerial outcome declaration will be issued at the conclusion of the day’s discussions, to identify viable policies and strategies which can be adapted to the unique security situations of cities, nations and regions, supported by greater shared intelligence and increased use of INTERPOL’S comprehensive databases covering a wide range of multi-national criminal activities.

INTERPOL is the largest international police organization with 190 member countries. Its work supports local national and regional law enforcement in a range of crime areas including; terrorism, organized crime, environmental crime, war crimes, maritime piracy, trafficking in illicit goods, weapons smuggling, human trafficking, money laundering, child sexual abuse, corruption and cybercrime.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

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Ontario man sought by Interpol for alleged fraud

April 25, 2012

Toronto Sun on April 24, 2012 released the following:

“BY HEATHER RIVERS, WOODSTOCK SENTINEL-REVIEW

WOODSTOCK — An Ontario man has been listed on Interpol as being sought by authorities.

William Charles Rath, 70, is listed as wanted on the Interpol website by U.S. police in the Western District of Kentucky/Puducah.

The website said Rath was born in Ingersoll.

Media accounts from 2005 say Rath owned a home in Uniondale at the time the charges of fraud and money laundering were laid.

Three U.S. men were also charged in the case.

Rath allegedly defrauded 200 people through the TCI investment club and was named in a $765-million US class-action lawsuit.

According to a statement of claim filed in Ontario Superior Court of Justice in London in 2005, TCI Investment Club took in at least $15 million US from investors across North America, including several hundred in southwestern Ontario.

Rath was detained in Canada on the U.S. charges and posted $100,000 bail before disappearing.

Anyone with information is asked to contact local, national police or the General Secretariat of Interpol.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


INTERPOL-EU ties securing borders & preventing crime

March 21, 2012

Uploaded by INTERPOLHQ to YouTube on March 20, 2012 released the following:

INTERPOL-EU ties securing borders & preventing crime

“INTERPOL: Interview with Cecilia Malmstrom, EU Home Affairs Commissioner. 15 March 2012

INTERPOL a key partner for a secure Europe, says EU Commissioner Malmström

LYON, France — A secure Europe needs global law enforcement support, with INTERPOL a key partner in meeting security challenges, European Commissioner for Home Affairs Cecilia Malmström told police chiefs at the closing of the INTERPOL Heads of National Central Bureaus conference.

Addressing the 270 senior police officials from 148 countries, Commissioner Malmström said that to effectively fight organized crime and cybercrime, which pose the greatest risks to EU security, the need for partnerships with countries beyond Europe is essential.

“INTERPOL, with its National Central Bureaus in 190 member countries is a key partner for the European Union in addressing these global threats,” said Commissioner Malmström.

“Day-to-day cooperation between INTERPOL and police forces in the EU member states goes back many years and is invaluable in linking EU criminal intelligence with INTERPOL’s databases and global network.”

Highlighting the need for close cooperation in tackling these shared threats, the Commissioner explained her plans to establish a European Cybercrime Centre to work closely with the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore, which will include a state-of-the-art facility for boosting cyber security and countering cybercrime, to assist in the streamlining of regional and global investigations.

An important element in the enhanced cooperation between the two organizations was the opening of the INTERPOL liaison office in Brussels in 2009. Pierre Reuland, the Special Representative of INTERPOL to the European Union, said that ‘when it comes to global police cooperation INTERPOL is the natural partner to link EU member countries and agencies to the rest of the world’.

In meetings with Secretary General Ronald K. Noble and other senior INTERPOL officials, Commissioner Malmström discussed a range of activities where the EU and INTERPOL work closely together, particularly under the EU’s Internal Security Strategy.

“INTERPOL is working closer than ever with European bodies such as Europol, Frontex, Cepol and Eurojust in crime areas as diverse as maritime piracy, human trafficking and counterfeiting,” said Secretary General Noble.

“The European Union has recognized INTERPOL’s unique capacity to supplement law enforcement efforts at the European level, particularly in the effective management of borders where transnational criminals are at their most vulnerable,” added the INTERPOL Chief.

An EU-funded programme has seen expansion of access to INTERPOL’s unique global database of Stolen and Lost Travel Documents throughout the Commonwealth of Independent States, Southeast Asia, Africa and the Americas, helping to secure borders and identify criminals attempting to enter Europe, and elsewhere, using false identities.

Plans for the West African Police Information System (WAPIS) being developed with INTERPOL and funded by the EU were also discussed during the high-level meeting. The WAPIS project will facilitate the collection, centralization, management, sharing and analysis of police information on a national, regional and global level to more effectively tackle crime areas such as drug trafficking, illegal immigration, money laundering and weapons trafficking.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


International cooperation sees arrest of Romanian INTERPOL Red Notice suspect

October 10, 2011

INTERPOL on October 7, 2011 released the following:

“LYON, France – A Romanian national who is the subject of an INTERPOL Red Notice for internationally-wanted persons has been arrested in Spain following close collaboration between INTERPOL’s National Central Bureaus in Romania and Spain and INTERPOL’s Fugitive Investigative Support (FIS) unit at its General Secretariat headquarters.

Ioan Clamparu, aged 42, had been on the run from his native Romania for eight years where he has been sentenced to 13 years in jail for people and drugs trafficking.

Clamparu was one of 450 international fugitives targeted by INTERPOL’s Operation Infra-Red in July 2010 which aimed to locate individuals convicted of serious crimes.

There were European Arrest Warrants for Clamparu from Romania and Italy for prostitution, money laundering and drugs trafficking, and there were several cases pending against him also in Spain.

Among the charges he faces, Clamparu is alleged to have forced young women into prostitution across Europe after promising them jobs as cleaners and waitresses.

“The arrest of Clamparu after years on the run is testimony to the dedication and tenacity of the law enforcement officers of all our member countries involved, and especially in Romania and Spain, who ensured that this fugitive’s crimes and victims were not forgotten,” said Stefano Carvelli, Assistant Director of INTERPOL’s Fugitive Investigative Support unit which ensured international collaboration to coordinate intelligence updates on the case.

“That Clamparu was highlighted as a target in Operation Infra-Red, INTERPOL’s global appeal to the public for information on fugitives, was one of many important steps taken by Romanian authorities to maintain the pressure on this wanted man and use every resource available to them in his eventual location and arrest,” added Mr Carvelli.

A Spanish National Court has remanded Clamparu in custody in Madrid pending extradition hearings for his return to Romania.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Making Interpol Relevant Again

September 7, 2011

The Wall Street Journal on September 5, 2011 released the following:

“Since 9/11, Leader Has Worked to Make the Organization Central to Member Nations’ Fight Against Terrorism
By DAVID PEARSON

PARIS—If the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, changed the way the world looks at terrorism, they also served as a wake-up call for Interpol, the world’s largest law-enforcement agency.

“Since that day, the lights have never gone out at Interpol,” Secretary-General Ronald K. Noble says.

A decade ago, Interpol was a slow, sleepy, unresponsive institution headquartered in Lyon, a French city better known for its cuisine than for law enforcement. The agency worked 9-5, five days a week and there was little sense among member countries that they were fighting a common war on terrorism.

Ronald Noble, at a June conference in Singapore, is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation to generate additional funding.

Prior to 9/11, by Mr. Noble’s own admission, Interpol had become “irrelevant”; it wasn’t taken seriously by countries engaged in fighting terrorists. In fact, Mr. Noble is still smarting from the fact that he was alerted to the World Trade Center attacks by a phone call from his brother in the U.S. telling him to switch on his TV, rather than from a law-enforcement agency asking for help.

Under Mr. Noble’s leadership over the past decade all that has changed. The organization is now the indispensable international clearinghouse for exchanging information on terrorists and other international criminals.

Ironically, just prior to 9/11, Mr. Noble had set in motion a major overhaul of the institution to make sure it stayed awake 24/7 to provide immediate assistance, to streamline its international alert system and to allow police forces around the world to be permanently connected to Interpol’s databases.

Contrary to popular belief, Interpol doesn’t have cross-border crime-fighting SWAT teams that can be scrambled into action, though it does send employees to countries that request help, for example in identifying disaster victims. Mr. Noble says he would shoot down any suggestion that Interpol should head up an international antiterrorist squad. “That would be a bad idea. Virtually no country would want that, and they shouldn’t want that,” he says, as sovereign states should be responsible for law enforcement on their own territories.

Interpol serves primarily as the nerve center for member countries’ law-enforcement agencies to exchange information on international crime. Its areas of expertise cover the gamut of criminal activity, including drugs and human trafficking; money laundering, intellectual property offenses, art theft, organized crime and cybercrime. But cracking down on international terrorism is now a major focus.

If Mr. Noble has one burning ambition, it is to plug the holes that allow terrorists and other criminals to travel unhindered using false documents. He’s been working toward that goal over the past decade, but he’s still only halfway there.

“Last year, there were half a billion searches of our database” of stolen or lost travel documents as travelers had their passports scanned by immigration officials, Mr. Noble says. “The same year there were a billion international arrivals. It means there were half a billion times when the passports of international arrivals were not screened against the only database of stolen passports.” Only 153 of Interpol’s 188 member countries are providing details—but not the names—on 23 million cancelled travel documents, and the U.S. only hooked up to the system in 2009. What particularly worries Mr. Noble is that only 44 countries—he won’t say which—regularly check passports against the Interpol database.

“What about the rest? There is no rational reason to explain why every country in the world isn’t connected and doesn’t screen. It certainly is not a reason based on cost,” he says. “Greater priority is currently being given to detecting passengers carrying mineral-water bottles than potential terrorists carrying stolen passports and that shouldn’t be the case.”

The 55-year-old son of a black American GI who met Mr. Noble’s German mother while on active service in Cold War Germany, he learned about hard work as a youngster while helping his father with his cleaning company business in New Jersey.

Ronald Noble attended the prestigious Stanford Law School and, after a stint as a federal prosecutor, taught at New York University School of Law before being nominated by former President Bill Clinton to head the U.S. Treasury’s law-enforcement division. He has led four of the eight main U.S. law-enforcement agencies, including the Secret Service, Customs and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

In 2000, Mr. Noble was elected by the representatives of the 188 member countries to head Interpol, billeted in a massive concrete, steel and glass cube overlooking the Rhône river. Last year, he was elected to a third five-year term.

With its annual budget of about €60 million ($85 million)—less than the cost of a small Airbus jet—Interpol is woefully underfunded for the job that it has to do, Mr. Noble feels. “The priority for Interpol in the next five, 10 or 20 years should be to make sure we have a structure and system in place for sharing crime-related information that’s linked to the internet, to make sure we know who’s behind the click of a mouse or the sending or receiving of a message. To achieve that will require a great deal of money and commitment on the part of our member countries,” he says.

How much? “It should be €1 billion a year. You look at the hundreds of billions of dollars governments spend each year on foreign aid and when you think about which element of foreign aid should be of paramount importance, the answer must be the security of countries and businesses and citizens,” he says. A massive increase in Interpol’s resources “will help us prevent organized crime groups from proliferating in the next 10 years like they have in the past 10 years,” he adds.

At a time when cash-strapped governments are tightening their purse strings, Interpol clearly isn’t going to get the funding it would like from governments’ mandatory contributions. So Mr. Noble is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation that would channel a revenue stream from private users, for example from airlines and banks that routinely scan the passports of their passengers or customers. Some say they would gladly pay a few pennies per scan for peace of mind that the documents aren’t listed as stolen or lost. “This could save airlines, banks and hotels hundreds of millions of dollars a year in gained cost efficiencies and reduced risk while generating ten or so millions of dollars a year in revenue that Interpol could use for enhanced border security world-wide,” he says.

Mr. Noble said he has told Interpol’s membership that he won’t seek a fourth term. “I believe the best thing that I can do for the U.S. and all countries is to complete my mandate here at Interpol and then go back to teaching law.” Mr. Noble has a standing tenure for his professorship at NYU, which has allowed him to carry on his other activities while giving him credit for a summer law course that he teaches at the National University of Singapore.

His commitment to Interpol borders on the obsessive. “Over the last 10 years, Interpol is almost all I’ve been,” he says. A self-confessed workaholic, he frequently puts in working days of 14 hours or more and is often on the road, visiting member countries. “I’ve been trained to lead by example,” he says. Indeed, he is so married to his job that he has an apartment adjoining his office. “There is always a country’s head of police or head of terrorism or head of some unit who’s awake, and I can always be reached with my BlackBerry.”

Such a punishing regime comes at a cost, however, in terms of personal relationships and health. “It’s impossible to have a decent family life with hours like that,” he admits. “Now, for the health of my body and mind and a host of other reasons I regularly take time off, which I didn’t do before,” he says, adding that he now meditates and does yoga.

Although being the head of Interpol means that he’s a high-profile target, Mr. Noble takes that in his stride, relying on the countries that he visits to look after his security. But he has grumbled in the past about being harassed at border controls because of his appearance. “I know that I’ve been stopped at borders because I fit various profiles. I look like a person who could be Arabic, if I’m travelling from an Arab country; I could look like a drug-trafficker if I’m coming from a drugtrafficking country, or I could look like an illegal immigrant when I’m coming from a variety of countries,” he said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL Americas Conference Highlights Need For Innovation and Cooperation to Tackle 21st Century Crime

July 6, 2011

INTERPOL on July 6, 2011 released the following:

“ORANJESTAD, Aruba – For the Americas to effectively tackle the evolving threats from organized and transnational criminals, law enforcement must continue to adapt and look towards its global partners, the region’s police chiefs heard on the opening day of the INTERPOL Americas Regional conference.

With cybercrime, human trafficking and money laundering high on the agenda, identifying ways to address the borderless nature of 21st century crime is a key issue for the three-day meeting (6-8 July) which brings together more than 70 senior law enforcement officials from 32 countries and three international organizations.

Addressing the conference, Aruba’s Minister of Justice and Education Arthur Dowers said that no country could consider itself immune from any type of crime and that Aruba was fully committed to working with INTERPOL and each of its member countries.

“Not only law abiding citizens use the opportunities presented by globalization, but criminals and criminal organizations also willingly make use of it.

“Countering these organizations, which is one of the primary goals of the international community, will only be accomplished if we are willing to reconsider many of the existing collaboration strategies and create more effective and efficient transnational law enforcement networks,” said Minister Dowers.

Welcoming the delegates, Commissioner of Police Adolfo Richardson said: “Aruba is very honoured to be able to host such a prestigious conference where executives, policymakers and other representatives from different organizations from the region and other parts of the world are gathered to unite in the fight against crime, are united in the desire and effort to intensify the cooperation between the law enforcement organizations of our region.”

INTERPOL President Khoo Boon Hui said that the Americas conference provided the law enforcement community with a powerful platform for closer and more effective coordination and collaboration.

“The recently concluded General Assembly of the Organization of American States declared crime as the public enemy number one.

“Given this expression of strong political support, we must now work collectively as a law enforcement community to further strengthen the safety and security of this region and help it achieve its immense economic potential,” concluded President Khoo.

An important step in boosting the regional capacity is the new operations room in the INTERPOL Regional Bureau in Buenos Aires which will host INTERPOL’s second Command and Co-ordination Centre (CCC), providing operational support to police regionally and globally in initiatives and operations.”

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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