“INTERPOL issues global security alert advising increased vigilance for terrorist activity”

August 5, 2013

INTERPOL on August 3, 2013 released the following:

“LYON, France – Following a series of prison escapes across nine INTERPOL member countries in the past month alone, including in Iraq, Libya and Pakistan, the INTERPOL General Secretariat headquarters has issued a global security alert advising increased vigilance.

With suspected Al Qaeda involvement in several of the breakouts which led to the escape of hundreds of terrorists and other criminals, the INTERPOL alert requests the Organization’s 190 member countries’ assistance in order to determine whether any of these recent events are coordinated or linked.

INTERPOL is asking its member countries to closely follow and swiftly process any information linked to these events and the escaped prisoners. They are also requested to alert the relevant member country and INTERPOL General Secretariat headquarters if any escaped terrorist is located or intelligence developed which could help prevent another terrorist attack.

Staff at INTERPOL’s 24-hour Command and Coordination Centre and other specialized units are also prioritizing all information and intelligence in relation to the breakouts or terrorist plots in order to immediately inform relevant member countries of any updates.

August is the anniversary of violent terrorist incidents in Mumbai, India and Gluboky, Russia as well as in Jakarta, Indonesia. This week also marks the 15th anniversary of the US Embassy bombings in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in which more than 200 mostly African citizens were killed and 4,000 others injured.

In recent years, terrorist attacks focusing on diplomatic facilities in Afghanistan, Greece, India, Kenya, Libya, Pakistan, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tanzania, Turkey and Yemen have also resulted in hundreds of casualties of all nationalities.

The US State Department has also issued a global travel alert in response to credible intelligence suggesting that Al-Qaeda and affiliated organizations continue to plan terrorist attacks between now and 31 August, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa. In addition to the US authorities announcing the one-day closure of more than 20 diplomatic missions on Sunday 4 August, the UK Foreign Office has also confirmed the closure of the British embassy in Yemen on 4 and 5 August.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“Interpol warns of criminal focus on $176 billion carbon market”

August 5, 2013

RTCC.org on August 5, 2013 released the following:

“Crime agency says lack of oversight and transparency threaten the environmental integrity of the world’s carbon markets

By Ed King

Carbon trading schemes are at acute risk from criminal gangs and fraud, a new report from Interpol warns.

The police agency says uncertain regulations and a lack of oversight and transparency threaten the environmental and financial integrity of the world’s carbon markets, worth an estimated $176 billion.

And it says that there is a risk that if financial instruments related to carbon trading become too complex, the world’s carbon markets could spark a financial crisis on par with 2008.

The report says law enforcement agencies must be more aware of ‘carbon crimes’, improve communication between countries and impose tighter regulations on transactions and calculations of emissions reductions.

“Unlike traditional commodities, which at some time during the course of their market exchange must be physically delivered to someone, carbon credits do not represent a physical commodity but instead have been described as a legal fiction that is poorly understood by many sellers, buyers and traders,” Interpol says.

“This lack of understanding makes carbon trading particularly vulnerable to fraud and other illegal activity.”

Areas Interpol says criminals seek to exploit include over-claiming for credits, the sale of credits that do not exist, false claims relating to a project’s benefits, money laundering and online credit theft.

And it warns that even third party auditors, employed by schemes like the UN’s Clean Development Mechanism to verify projects, may be susceptible to “bribes or collusion” to manipulate the results.

“The discrepancy between the objectives of the financial players in the market – to maximize profit – and the overall objective of the Kyoto Protocol – to ensure overall greenhouse gas emissions are reduced – places diverse pressures on the regulation of the market when drawn alongside other typical commodity markets,” says the report.

Lucrative takings

High profile criminal cases include a 2010 hacking attack on cement maker Holcim, resulting in the theft of 1.6 million credits worth €23.5million, while in 2011 hackers stole two million carbon credits from registries in Austria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece and Poland.

In 2012 three men in the UK were sent to prison after running a £39 million tax fraud related to carbon trading. And earlier this year one of Britain’s most prolific money launderers Ian Macdonald was jailed for eight years for an £18 million carbon credits scam targeting vulnerable UK investors.

“It is imperative that the carbon trading markets remain secure from fraud, not just to protect financial investment, but also because the global environment depends upon it,” said Andrew Lauterback, Senior Criminal Enforcement Counsel at the US Environmental Protection Agency.

“This criminal activity risks seriously undermining the environmental integrity of the carbon markets globally,” added David Higgins from Interpol’s Environmental Crime Programme.

Jamal Gore, Deputy Chair of the International Carbon Reduction and Offset Alliance (ICROA) welcomed Interpol’s drive to raise awareness of criminality in the sector, but told RTCC many of the issues raised in the report had already been resolved.

“ICROA’s Code of Practice, the governance mechanisms of the voluntary carbon credit standards and the emergence of professionally managed carbon credit registries together address many if not all of the issues related to the voluntary carbon market that the guide raises,” he said.

“The publication of the guide in its current form therefore represents a missed opportunity. By highlighting both the challenges facing the carbon markets and the work already being done to drive best practice, it could have better served its purpose of reducing carbon trading crime. Instead it risks sowing doubt just when we need to redouble our efforts to fight climate change.”

Large target

Carbon trading is the world’s fastest growing commodities market. In June, China launched the first of seven pilot projects, with an aim of developing a national emissions trading scheme (ETS) by the end of the decade.

The UN runs two schemes, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI), which are targeted at improving low carbon investment in the developing world.

The EU ETS is worth an estimated $148 billion, the US-based Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) $249 million and New Zealand’s market $351 million.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“INTERPOL launches new technology to detect fraudulent travel documents”

July 31, 2013

INTERPOL on July 30, 2013 released the following:

“LYON, France – A new police tool has been launched by INTERPOL and the G8, enabling the INTERPOL community to exchange information on fraudulent identity and travel documents.

Known as Dial-Doc (Digital INTERPOL Alert Library – Document), the technology makes it easy for officials in any of INTERPOL’s 190 member countries to check if a travel document is fake, through comparison with worldwide images of counterfeit documents.

Dial-Doc will play a central role in the swift provision of information to law enforcement agencies, particularly in the fields of border management and the fight against identity fraud, human trafficking, terrorism, and financial crime.

It is an integral part of INTERPOL’s strategy to provide integrated solutions for border security and to offer access to an array of systems and data that help officers to prevent and combat transnational crime.

“This important reference tool for travel document fraud is the culmination of intensive and fruitful cooperation leveraging the combined expertise of INTERPOL and migration experts from the G8 countries,” said Lynn Lawless, Director, Enforcement and Intelligence Programs Management, Canada Border Services Agency, and representing the G8 Roma-Lyon Migration Experts Sub-Group.

“Dial-Doc will assist in the global fight against document and identity fraud and the criminal activity it facilitates,” she added.

Up until now, INTERPOL member countries have circulated their own ‘alerts’ relating to fraudulent travel documents. Dial Doc is the data processing platform which regulates this information and makes it accessible to all INTERPOL member countries in a user-friendly manner.

Once the country submits their ‘alert’ to INTERPOL, a quality control activity is performed before final validation and its publication within the INTERPOL Information System.

Fabrizio Di Carlo, Dial-Doc Project Manager, said: “The launch of Dial-Doc represents a milestone in the fight against forged documents. We now encourage as many countries as possible to share data related to fraudulent travel documents in order to fulfil the potential of this vital law enforcement tool.”

Dial-Doc is a web-based application, available to authorized users via I-24/7, the Organization’s secure global police communications system and its restricted-access website. Currently in English, the platform will in future be translated into INTERPOL’s three other official languages (Arabic, French and Spanish).”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“Russia Requests Interpol Warrant for Hermitage Capital Boss”

July 25, 2013

RIA Novosti on July 25, 2013 released the following:

“MOSCOW, July 25 (RIA Novosti) – Russia has officially asked Interpol to put Hermitage Capital equity fund head William Browder on an international wanted list, following his earlier sentencing in absentia, the Interior Ministry said Thursday.

“On orders by the Prosecutor General’s Office, the Russian branch of Interpol has sent a request to the Interpol General Secretariat to issue an international search warrant for British citizen Browder William Felix, born in 1964,” the ministry said in a statement.

The statement said Browder had been sought on charges of grand fraud and tax evasion involving illegal purchase of Gazprom shares.

Browder was tried in absentia by a Moscow court in July and was sentenced to nine years in jail and banned from doing business in Russia for three years.

The case against Browder stated that he “ran companies that took part in the purchase of Gazprom shares in 1999-2004 at domestic-market prices, circumventing a ban on their sale to foreigners.” The court also ruled that “he tried to get access to the company’s financial reporting documents” and to influence decision-making via the board of directors.

In May, Moscow requested Interpol to issue a “blue notice” for Browder, requiring all 190 member states to “collect additional information about a person’s identity, location or activities in relation to a crime.”

However, the Interpol General Secretariat rejected the request, citing “a predominantly political nature” of the case against Browder.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“INTERPOL issues global alert following Abu Ghraib and Taji prison breakout”

July 24, 2013

INTERPOL on July 24, 2013 released the following:

“Hundreds of dangerous criminals escape during raid

LYON, France – A regional security alert has been issued by INTERPOL at the request of Iraq following a mass breakout from two Iraqi prisons involving hundreds of dangerous prisoners, many of them members of Al-Qaida.

During the night of 21 July, gunmen attacked the Taji and Abu Ghraib prisons near Baghdad using mortars to gain access and free the prisoners, killing at least 20 members of the Iraqi security forces in the process. INTERPOL said the jailbreaks constituted a major threat to global security.

Many of the escaped prisoners were senior-level Al-Qaida members, some of whom had been sentenced to death.

Following confirmation of the escape from INTERPOL’s National Central Bureau in Baghdad, the Command and Coordination Centre at the General Secretariat headquarters issued the alert to member countries in the region to warn them of the threat posed by the fugitives.

INTERPOL is working closely with NCB Baghdad to collect information on the escaped prisoners, including photographs and fingerprints, with the view to issuing a global Orange Notice, to assist law enforcement officers regionally and worldwide in their search and eventual identification of the fugitives.

An Orange Notice can be issued by INTERPOL’s General Secretariat or an NCB for any act or event that poses a serious and imminent threat to the safety of citizens around the world.

A resolution underlining the need for member countries to alert the General Secretariat to prison escapes of suspected terrorists and other dangerous criminals was adopted at the INTERPOL General Assembly in 2006.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“Enhancing analytical skills in the fight against drugs and organized crime in the Americas focus of INTERPOL training”

July 22, 2013

INTERPOL on July 22, 2013 released the following:

“SAN JOSÉ, Costa Rica – Some 20 law enforcement officials from Central America, the Caribbean and neighbouring countries have gathered in Costa Rica for a criminal intelligence training session focused on combating drug trafficking and transnational organized crime in the region.

The two-week course (8 – 19 July), organized by INTERPOL with the support of the National Central Bureau in San José, is part of the INTERPOL Capacity Building Programme on Criminal Intelligence Analysis for the Americas, a one-year programme coordinated by INTERPOL to boost the criminal analysis skills of national law enforcement to more effectively fight drug trafficking and organized crime across the Americas.

The course aims to equip intelligence analysts and investigators from drug enforcement, customs, border and immigration agencies with the skills needed to analyse large amounts of criminal information, and to develop accurate intelligence. Common analytical techniques and how to effectively use INTERPOL’s global tools and services, as well as best practices in international cooperation were also included in the programme.

The training, sponsored by the Government of Canada, included a section on instructor development, where participants learned how to design and develop original course curricula and effectively deliver the content to their colleagues upon returning to their home countries.

Countries which attended the training: Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Peru, Panama, in addition to a representative from La Escuela Regional de la Comunidad Americana de Inteligencia Antidrogas (ERCAIAD).

This is the second of two basic criminal intelligence courses in the programme, the first of which was held in Barbados in May, for the English-speaking Caribbean.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“Anti-Whaling Activist Paul Watson Marks a Year of Fleeing on the Sea”

July 17, 2013

motherboard.vice.com on July 16, 2013 released the following:

“By Ben Richmond

Just as Edward Snowden is caught in the in-between-nation zone of a Moscow airport, the anti-whaling activist Paul Watson is caught in a nation-free life at sea. Watson hasn’t been into a port since fleeing Germany in July last year in order to keep himself from being extradited to Japan.

Watson is the founder of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, which fights to preserve marine life most famously by directly disrupting whaling operations. The group’s aggressive actions have earned it attention from the public, via the Animal Planet show Whale Wars, and from governments, including those of the United States, Canada, and Japan, which calls them eco-terrorists.

Last known to be aboard the Sea Shepherd ship the MY Steve Irwin when it confronted Japanese ships in the Southern Ocean in February, Watson’s exact whereabouts are currently unknown. Still, for being a refugee, Watson maintains a fairly high media profile. He regularly gives interviews about Sea Shepard’s actions and also his own tenuous situation.

Legal trouble has been a defining trait for the man who describes himself as a “pirate of compassion.” The origins of his life-on-the-lam span continents and decades. In 2002, Watson and a Sea Shepherd ship was sailing through Guatemalan waters when they came across a Costa Rican vessel that was slicing fins off of sharks.

According to Peter Hammarstedt, a spokesman for Sea Shepherd, they called the authorities and took control of the fishing ship, only to have the Guatemalans show up with a gunboat to arrest Watson. The Sea Shepherd fled to Costa Rica, where Watson was charged with “violating navigational regulations.” The charges were dropped, and then reinstated.

Ten years later, Watson was detained at an airport in Frankfurt on behalf of Costa Rica. While being detained, it occurred to Watson that the Japanese—his longtime arch nemeses—might be behind the arrest, not Costa Rica. “We have created some very powerful enemies in the Japanese government,” Hammarstedt told The New York Times, and also said that Watson thought the Japanese were behind the arrest.

So when Watson was released on bail, he fled rather than risk extradition. “I decided I know if I go to Japan I’m not going to be released, ever. So I left Germany,” he told CTV. To review, Watson was arrested in Germany on charges by Costa Rica, for actions in Guatemalan waters, potentially as just a front for the Japanese.

A month after he took to the sea, Interpol issued a red notice at Costa Rica’s behalf. They issued another red notice a month later on behalf of Japan, on charges of breaking in and damaging a whaling ship in 2010. Whether or not he would extradited to Japan before, he almost definitely would now.

The international criminal co-operation system makes any port, save for the least savory, potentially dangerous, according to Robert Currie, a law professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax.

“He could very well be arrested in quite a large number of countries and the countries where he couldn’t get arrested are probably countries where he wouldn’t want to go,” Currie told CTV.

And so Watson wanders the high seas, transferring from ship to ship in international waters, unable to see his daughter and grandchildren in Seattle. Like Snowden, he is a man who cannot safely enter or leave a country. That must suck. But the open seas still sound better than being stuck in an airport.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Edward Snowden, Evo Morales and the Overflight Rights of State Aircraft

July 11, 2013

lawprofessors.typepad.com on July 3, 2013 released the following:

“We wanted to check in with a few thoughts on the fascinating events surrounding the rerouting of Bolivian President Evo Morales’ return flight from Moscow. While there are conflicting news reports as to exactly what happened, it appears that President Morales’ aircraft, while en route from Russia to Bolivia, was denied permission to enter French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese airspace. The aircraft landed in Austria to refuel, where, according to some reports, it was searched by local authorities before finally being permitted to continue the flight home today. It is widely believed that the aforementioned governments denied Morales overflight authorization because of pressure from the United States government which believed Edward Snowden, wanted in connection with U.S. security leaks, may have been aboard the aircraft.

Leaving aside the many related issues that are outside the purview of this blog, the denial of overflight authorization to Morales’ aircraft has garnered criticism from many Latin American leaders and raised questions of international law. We thought it would be helpful to provide a few brief points of reference with regard to the relevant international aviation law surrounding the situation.

First, overflights by State aircraft fall largely outside of the 1944 Convention on International Civil Aviation, the basis for most of what we discuss as “international aviation law.” Article 3 of the Convention limits the Convention’s application to civil, as opposed to State, aircraft. While State aircraft isn’t fully defined, there is no question that aircraft transporting a sitting State president on official State business qualifies.

Article 3(c) prohibits State aircraft from flying over the territory of another State without prior authorization. While obtaining overflight authorization for diplomatic aircraft such as the one carrying Morales is often routine (a description of U.S. authorization procedures can be found here), States have a clear legal right to deny such authorization. We don’t currently know enough about what Morales’ original intended flight path was, and what, if any, authorizations were obtained prior to takeoff only to be later revoked. Given States’ broad sovereign authority in this area, there doesn’t appear to be any violations of international law, at least not as relates to aviation. Of course, such an unusual incident is certain to carry diplomatic and political consequences regardless of legality.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“FactCheck: are Interpol red notices often wrong?”

July 9, 2013

The Conversation on July 7, 2013 released the following:

“”The Australian Federal Police takes [red notices] very seriously but knows it must examine the veracity or otherwise of those claims because quite often claims, even against Australian citizens who’ve had red notices out against them, have been found to be wrong.” – Then immigration minister Brendan O’Connor, June 17, interview with Fairfax Media.

O’Connor’s questioning of the Interpol warnings known as “red notices” came after the organisation charged with facilitating international police cooperation admitted it had made a mistake. Interpol had issued a red notice stating that asylum seeker Sayed Ahmed Abdellatif had been convicted in Egypt in 1999 of premeditated murder and possession of explosives.

Interpol withdrew those allegations, although Abdellatif still remains subject to a red notice on the lesser charges of his alleged membership of an illegal extremist group and of creating forged travel documents. He denies all the allegations, saying any confession was a result of torture.

O’Connor’s remark that red notices were often wrong is at odds with the statement by the Australian Federal Police’s deputy commissioner, Peter Drennan, that police “rely heavily on the Interpol red notices” and that he had never come across an inaccurate one before.

So how reliable are red notices? O’Connor’s claim is hard to prove definitively because credible figures about Interpol’s accuracy aren’t available. A spokeswoman for O’Connor’s office told The Conversation that the statement was based on confidential information he received while minister for Home Affairs. We’ll have to take his word for that, although his office was unable to provide examples of Australian citizens subject to red notices that later proved inaccurate.

What we do know is that countries are increasingly using red notices through Interpol – 190 countries now participate – to help locate “wanted” persons. In 2011, these international requests with the view to the arrest and extradition of targeted people rose to about 26,000 warnings (including all types of Interpol notices and requests) – in contrast to 16,000 in 2010.

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) such as Fair Trials International have questioned the effectiveness of Interpol as a crime-fighting organisation because of its limited internal controls to tackle political abuses.

The Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe has called for reforms. It highlighted a failure to detect and prevent politically-motivated misuse and expressed “concern about the abuse of the red notice system by states whose judicial systems do not meet international standards”.

So O’Connor’s call to examine the “veracity or otherwise of those claims” is justifiable. We do know that red notice warnings are not always complete and have sometimes proved inaccurate. They are not legally binding and they are not always based on a court decision. Interpol’s acknowledgement that a person subject to a red notice deserves the presumption of innocence can be drowned out by political motivation and unreliable information.

Interpol’s credibility has also been dented because some of its members have poor human rights records and corrupt, undemocratic governments. Countries such as Belarus, Egypt, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran and Indonesia have all been accused of abusing the red notice networks for political purposes.

Russia, for example, recently used a red notice request to encourage the extradition of Petr Silaev, a young Russian activist, on the offence of “hooliganism” – the same vague charge used to punish and imprison the punk band Pussy Riot.

Despite Petr’s initial arrest and detention in Spain, Spanish authorities later dismissed Russia’s extradition request as a form of political harassment. Nonetheless, Petr remains confined to Spain and on Interpol’s databases.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, an Australian, and anti-whaling activist Paul Watson have found themselves subject to controversial Interpol red notice. Their supporters claim the notices were politically motivated, although Sweden (in the case of Assange) and Japan (in the case of Watson) would argue they have been properly applied.

Verdict

Interpol red notices should never be taken at face value. There is evidence that they are sometimes politically motivated and some have proved inaccurate, but claiming they are “often wrong” is a stretch.

Review

The check is correct. Out of the roughly 7,000 red notices issued every year, some are used for political purposes in contravention of Interpol’s own rules. There are a number of high profile cases which highlight this.

As an international organisation, Interpol generally accepts at face value the information submitted by its members. It is up to other nations to decide on the reliability of the information and to decide whether or not to action requests.

Australia exercises this discretion and any police action is testable in our courts in the first instance. Any request for extradition based on a red notice must go through the normal extradition process. But there is no evidence that overall the notices are “often wrong” and no Australian figures that would back up this claim. – Grant Wardlaw”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


“INTERPOL Americas conference focuses on cooperation in combating transnational crime”

July 2, 2013

INTERPOL on July 1, 2013 released the following:

“WILLEMSTAD, Curaçao – INTERPOL’s 22nd Americas Regional Conference opened today in Curaçao with a focus on strengthening information sharing, collaboration and border management to more effectively combat transnational organized crime throughout the region and beyond.

Prime Minister of Curaçao, Ivar Asjes, attended the opening ceremony of the three-day meeting (1-3 July) which brings together nearly 70 senior law enforcement officials from 33 countries and five international organizations, to address crime issues ranging from terrorism, people smuggling and drug trafficking, to fugitive investigations and cybercrime.

Opening the conference, Curaçao’s Minister of Justice, Nelson Navarro, said the interchange of knowledge was very important.

“It is very difficult for small countries to cope with the costs involved in the fight against international crime, so cooperation between Justice Ministers and with INTERPOL on a structural basis is essential,” said Minister Navarro.

With Curaçao one of INTERPOL’s newest member countries, having joined the world police body in 2011, Chief of Curaçao’s Police Force, Commissioner Marlon Wernet, said it was important for the country to be part of the global law enforcement community.

“This conference organized in our country is a strong indication for our region and world, that we are more than willing and ready to work together with all member states of INTERPOL, local and international law enforcement agencies, to make and maintain our country, region and world safe and as free as possible from criminal activities,” said Commissioner Wernet. “There is no doubt that together we stand and divided we are weak and would fall.”

INTERPOL President Mireille Ballestrazzi said the conference was of crucial importance in sharing best practice and expertise in addressing both traditional and emerging transnational organized crime threats.

“It is our ability to work together which is key in maintaining our concerted and joint efforts to effectively tackle transnational crime,” said President Ballestrazzi, pointing to the need to reinforce cooperation already in place as well as identifying opportunities for additional partnerships.

“It is clear that an effective police force is one which adapts to the constantly evolving challenges, which is why training also forms an important part of INTERPOL’s support to member countries in their efforts in combating all forms of crime.”

In this respect, President Ballestrazzi emphasized the added value of INTERPOL’s Regional Bureaus in Buenos Aires and San Salvador which have enabled INTERPOL to build on its operational support to member countries in the region and beyond, pointing to recent operations targeting drug trafficking and trafficking in illicit goods and counterfeiting.

With expanding use and access to INTERPOL’s databases also high on the agenda, delegates will be updated on the INTERPOL Illicit Arms Records and tracing Management System (iARMS), the first international centralized system for reporting and querying lost, stolen, trafficked and smuggled firearms.

To date, 74 member countries, including 10 from the Americas region, have successfully connected to the system, which since 1 January this year has seen the addition of more than 273,000 records, making iARMS one of the fastest growing databases in the world.”

————————————————————–

Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email: