“INTERPOL issues Red Notice for arrest of Samantha Lewthwaite at Kenya’s request”

September 26, 2013

INTERPOL on September 26, 2013 released the following:

“Public’s help in identifying and locating ‘White Widow’ fugitive crucial, says INTERPOL Chief

LYON, France – An INTERPOL Red Notice, or internationally wanted persons alert, has been issued for UK national Samantha Lewthwaite at the request of authorities in Kenya.

Lewthwaite, aged 29, who is also believed to use the alias ‘Natalie Webb’, is wanted by Kenya on charges of being in possession of explosives and conspiracy to commit a felony dating back to December 2011.

Circulated to all 190 INTERPOL member countries, the Red Notice represents one of INTERPOL’s most powerful tools in tracking international fugitives.

“By requesting an INTERPOL Red Notice, Kenya has activated a global ‘tripwire’ for this fugitive,” said INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble.

“Through the INTERPOL Red Notice, Kenyan authorities have ensured that all 190 member countries are aware of the danger posed by this woman, not just across the region but also worldwide,” said the Head of INTERPOL.

Containing identification details and judicial information about a wanted person, INTERPOL Red Notices communicate to police worldwide that a person is wanted by a member country and request that the suspect be placed under provisional arrest pending extradition.

Secretary General Noble said the publication of the Red Notice for Samantha Lewthwaite meant that the public could also play a crucial role in providing information to law enforcement to help identify and locate her.

With Lewthwaite previously only wanted at the national level for alleged possession of a fraudulently obtained South African passport, Secretary General Noble said this case underlined the ‘invisible threat’ posed by terrorists and criminals travelling internationally using illicit passports.

“Every year hundreds of millions of individuals are boarding international transport and crossing borders without having the authenticity of their travel or identity document checked. This dramatically compromises our ability to effectively screen and identify at airports and land crossings those individuals who could be suspected criminals and terrorists,” said Mr Noble.

The INTERPOL Chief pointed to a significant gap in international security by highlighting that despite approximately 1.1 billion international trips being made in 2012, only 700 million travel documents were screened against INTERPOL’s Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database which currently contains more than 38.5 million records from 166 countries.

“Until this glaring hole in global security is properly addressed, no country in the world can consider itself safe from terrorists and other criminals crossing borders to harm their citizens and visitors,” concluded Secretary General Noble.

Samantha Lewthwaite is the widow of Germaine Lindsay, one of the four bombers involved in the 7 July terror attacks in London in 2005, in which 52 people were killed and hundreds more injured.”

A copy of the Red Notice may be found here.

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“Interpol Red Notices and the Rights of Refugees”

August 14, 2013

Huffington Post on August 13, 2013 released the following:

By: Alex Tinsley

“Late last month, INTERPOL, the international police cooperation body, highlighted a news story on its website, suggesting it should be in the running for a Nobel Peace Prize because of the significant changes in the organisation in the last decade.

In terms of numbers, there is no doubt that INTERPOL is growing fast. In 2011, it issued 7,678 Red Notices – ‘wanted person’ alerts, which inform police and border agents across the world that a person is wanted in a certain country. The figure has more than quintupled since 2001.

However, as the recent cases of Sayed Abdel Latif and Mukhtar Ablyazov have showed, the increasing recourse to INTERPOL’s systems is having a dramatic impact upon the institution of asylum, leaving some important unanswered questions about how Red Notices affect refugees.

Syed Abdel Latif is the Egyptian national who sparked an international media storm after he claimed asylum in Australia. Checking his name against INTERPOL’s databases, the Federal Police spotted a Red Notice stating that he was wanted to serve prison sentences in Egypt for convictions for murder and terrorist violent crimes. Cue public outcry at a dangerous man living in a family asylum centre.

However, Latif’s lawyers dug around, and discovered that he had, in fact, been convicted not of murder and mayhem but of membership of an illegal organisation – in a trial which observers criticised for its use of evidence obtained under torture. INTERPOL reportedly updated the Red Notice and suddenly the equation had changed.

It is, of course, helpful to know if someone claiming asylum is accused of serious crimes in their home state. But, as a Canadian Federal judge warned in 2010, Red Notices cannot be taken at face value on the assumption that they emanate from a ‘reliable, reputable and objective source’. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has indicated (page 28) that information in a Red Notice should be treated as if it came from the country behind the Red Notice – in this case Egypt. Indeed, reacting to the news, Australian minister Brendon O’Connor felt moved to go on record stating that Red Notices were ‘often wrong’ and need approaching with caution.

The reality, however, is that frontline police currently rely heavily on Red Notices: the information may come from a police office in a distant country, but it is approved by INTERPOL and carries its imprimatur. This is great for tackling serious cross-border crime, but it is also leading to increasing numbers of refugees being arrested on their travels.

This led to another big story, of Mukhtar Alblyazov, a Khazak banker reportedly granted asylum in the UK who was recently arrested in France as a result of a Red Notice – following the alarming arrest and expulsion of his wife and daughter in Italy. INTERPOL is reported to have responded to the story stating that police consulting its systems would not have known he was a refugee, only that he was wanted for crimes.

True enough, INTERPOL may not always know a person has asylum, but a savvy observer should recognise persecution when it sees it, and other, more clear-cut cases Fair Trials International has seen recently show that some countries are currently getting past INTERPOL’s controls.

Consider the case of Petr Silaev [], previously featured on this website: a young activist who took part in a demonstration in Moscow, fled the ensuing police crackdown and was recognised as a refugee in Finland, only to be arrested in Spain after an investigator in Moscow issued an INTERPOL alert to try him for ‘hooliganism’. The Spanish court, highly suspicious of the investigator who was after Petr, sensed illegitimate motives and refused to cooperate. INTERPOL could have done so itself, sparing Petr his ordeal. In the video below, Petr discusses the impact of this arrest on his life.

Cases like these have prompted the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the world’s largest regional security organisation, to call on INTERPOL to reform its oversight mechanisms, while members of the European Parliament are beginning to recognise that ‘something must be done’ to prevent the arrest of those recognised as political refugees in the EU.

Indeed, the arrest of a refugee is a serious matter. These are people the international community has chosen to protect, and INTERPOL must do all it can to avoid undermining that protection. As INTERPOL nears its 100th birthday, it is an opportune moment to have the discussion about the way forward.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“FactCheck: are Interpol red notices often wrong?”

July 9, 2013

The Conversation on July 7, 2013 released the following:

“”The Australian Federal Police takes [red notices] very seriously but knows it must examine the veracity or otherwise of those claims because quite often claims, even against Australian citizens who’ve had red notices out against them, have been found to be wrong.” – Then immigration minister Brendan O’Connor, June 17, interview with Fairfax Media.

O’Connor’s questioning of the Interpol warnings known as “red notices” came after the organisation charged with facilitating international police cooperation admitted it had made a mistake. Interpol had issued a red notice stating that asylum seeker Sayed Ahmed Abdellatif had been convicted in Egypt in 1999 of premeditated murder and possession of explosives.

Interpol withdrew those allegations, although Abdellatif still remains subject to a red notice on the lesser charges of his alleged membership of an illegal extremist group and of creating forged travel documents. He denies all the allegations, saying any confession was a result of torture.

O’Connor’s remark that red notices were often wrong is at odds with the statement by the Australian Federal Police’s deputy commissioner, Peter Drennan, that police “rely heavily on the Interpol red notices” and that he had never come across an inaccurate one before.

So how reliable are red notices? O’Connor’s claim is hard to prove definitively because credible figures about Interpol’s accuracy aren’t available. A spokeswoman for O’Connor’s office told The Conversation that the statement was based on confidential information he received while minister for Home Affairs. We’ll have to take his word for that, although his office was unable to provide examples of Australian citizens subject to red notices that later proved inaccurate.

What we do know is that countries are increasingly using red notices through Interpol – 190 countries now participate – to help locate “wanted” persons. In 2011, these international requests with the view to the arrest and extradition of targeted people rose to about 26,000 warnings (including all types of Interpol notices and requests) – in contrast to 16,000 in 2010.

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) such as Fair Trials International have questioned the effectiveness of Interpol as a crime-fighting organisation because of its limited internal controls to tackle political abuses.

The Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe has called for reforms. It highlighted a failure to detect and prevent politically-motivated misuse and expressed “concern about the abuse of the red notice system by states whose judicial systems do not meet international standards”.

So O’Connor’s call to examine the “veracity or otherwise of those claims” is justifiable. We do know that red notice warnings are not always complete and have sometimes proved inaccurate. They are not legally binding and they are not always based on a court decision. Interpol’s acknowledgement that a person subject to a red notice deserves the presumption of innocence can be drowned out by political motivation and unreliable information.

Interpol’s credibility has also been dented because some of its members have poor human rights records and corrupt, undemocratic governments. Countries such as Belarus, Egypt, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran and Indonesia have all been accused of abusing the red notice networks for political purposes.

Russia, for example, recently used a red notice request to encourage the extradition of Petr Silaev, a young Russian activist, on the offence of “hooliganism” – the same vague charge used to punish and imprison the punk band Pussy Riot.

Despite Petr’s initial arrest and detention in Spain, Spanish authorities later dismissed Russia’s extradition request as a form of political harassment. Nonetheless, Petr remains confined to Spain and on Interpol’s databases.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, an Australian, and anti-whaling activist Paul Watson have found themselves subject to controversial Interpol red notice. Their supporters claim the notices were politically motivated, although Sweden (in the case of Assange) and Japan (in the case of Watson) would argue they have been properly applied.

Verdict

Interpol red notices should never be taken at face value. There is evidence that they are sometimes politically motivated and some have proved inaccurate, but claiming they are “often wrong” is a stretch.

Review

The check is correct. Out of the roughly 7,000 red notices issued every year, some are used for political purposes in contravention of Interpol’s own rules. There are a number of high profile cases which highlight this.

As an international organisation, Interpol generally accepts at face value the information submitted by its members. It is up to other nations to decide on the reliability of the information and to decide whether or not to action requests.

Australia exercises this discretion and any police action is testable in our courts in the first instance. Any request for extradition based on a red notice must go through the normal extradition process. But there is no evidence that overall the notices are “often wrong” and no Australian figures that would back up this claim. – Grant Wardlaw”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

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INTERPOL issues Red Notice for suspected Canadian killer

June 5, 2012

INTERPOL on May 31, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – At the request of Canadian authorities INTERPOL has today issued a Red Notice, or international wanted persons alert, for Luka Rocco Magnotta who is suspected of killing a man and posting body parts to various locations around Canada.

29-year-old Magnotta, who is also known as Eric Clinton Newman or Vladimir Romanov, is believed to have fled the country and INTERPOL has circulated the Red Notice in all four official languages, Arabic, English, French and Spanish to its 190 member countries.

INTERPOL Red Notices serve to communicate to police worldwide that a person is wanted by a member country and request that the suspect be placed under provisional arrest pending extradition.

Further enquiries relating to the investigation should be directed to the Canadian authorities.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

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INTERPOL issues Red Notices seeking arrest of four suspects in New Delhi car bomb attack targeting Israeli officials

March 23, 2012

INTERPOL on March 22, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – INTERPOL, acting on a request from India’s Central Bureau of Investigation, has issued Red Notices for four suspects wanted in connection with the 13 February bomb attack on an Israeli diplomat’s car in New Delhi.

Details of the suspects Mohammadreza Abolghashemi, Houshang Afshar Irani, Seyed Ali Mahdiansadr and Masoud Sedaghatzadeh who are all wanted for terrorism related offences including criminal conspiracy and attempted murder, have been transmitted to INTERPOL’s 190 member countries.

The attack left a 42-year-old female diplomat with serious injuries and also wounded her driver and two bystanders.

INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble said India’s request for the Red Notices would make it extremely difficult for the suspects to travel internationally in an attempt to evade capture.

“Through requesting INTERPOL Red Notices, India has ensured that law enforcement officials around the globe are alerted to the wanted status of these fugitives, and therefore reduces their options for international travel,” said Mr Noble.

“INTERPOL is uniquely placed to ensure that vital police information and support are made available to the global law enforcement community when and where it is needed,” concluded the head of INTERPOL.

INTERPOL Red Notices serve to communicate to the world’s police that a suspect is wanted by a member country and request that the suspect be placed under provisional arrest pending extradition.

INTERPOL will not comment further on the Red Notices that were issued today. All enquiries concerning the charges and suspects should be directed to the India’s Central Bureau of Investigation in New Delhi.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Turkey seeks Red Notice in flotilla attack

October 14, 2011

UPI.com on October 13, 2011 released the following:

“ISTANBUL, Turkey, Oct. 13 (UPI) — A Turkey prosecutor is seeking a Red Notice for 174 Israelis involved in a 2010 flotilla raid that killed nine activists on a Turkish aid ship, a report says.

Today’s Zaman said the Bugun daily reported Thursday Istanbul Public Prosecutor Mehmet Akif Ekinci, who is investigating the May 2010 flotilla attack, had reportedly written to the Turkish Justice Ministry requesting Interpol Red Notices for the Israeli soldiers and commanders.

The Bugun report also said the Istanbul Chief Prosecutor’s Office had written to Israeli authorities seeking names and home addresses of military and government officials who gave orders to attack the ship and those who carried out the raid on the ship, which was carrying humanitarian aid.

After Israel refused to provide the information, the prosecutor requested help from the Turkish National Intelligence Organization, which obtained the identities of the Israelis through Facebook, Bugun said.

Israeli would not confirm the identities, prompting the prosecutor to go to the Justice Ministry, Bugun said.

The Istanbul Prosecutor’s Office had earlier denied Ekinci asked the NIO to identify the Israelis involved in the attack and said the list of names came from the Humanitarian Aid Foundation, the Turkish charity that owns the ship.

The ship, the Mavi Marmara, was part of an international humanitarian aid flotilla that tried to break the Israeli blockade of Gaza.

Turkey said it would not recognize the blockade’s legitimacy and called on Israel to apologize for the raid and pay compensation for the nine people who were killed — eight Turkish nationals and a Turkish-American. Relations between the countries have been tense since then, and Turkey downgraded diplomatic ties with Israel and suspended all military agreements.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Report: Turkish prosecutor seeks Interpol notice for flotilla attackers

October 13, 2011

Today’s Zaman on October 13, 2011 released the following:

“A Turkish prosecutor has taken action for the issuance of Interpol red notices for 174 Israeli soldiers and commanders involved in a May 2010 attack on a Turkish aid ship, the Bugün daily reported on Thursday.

İstanbul Public Prosecutor Mehmet Akif Ekinci, the prosecutor conducting the investigation into the deadly flotilla attack, had reportedly written to the Turkish Justice Ministry, requesting Interpol red notices for the 174 Israeli soldiers and commanders.

The report also said the İstanbul Chief Prosecutor’s Office had earlier written to Israeli authorities requesting the full names and residential addresses of the military and government officials who gave the orders to attack the flotilla, in addition to information about those who carried out the orders. Israel refused to provide the information, so the prosecutor asked the National Intelligence Organization (MİT) to share any intelligence information it has so far collected about the Israeli raid. The report said MİT obtained information on the identities of the Israeli soldiers who killed eight Turkish citizens and one Turkish-American in last year’s flotilla raid, identifying almost all of the soldiers who took part in the deadly raid through Facebook.

The report says a total of 174 people, including the soldiers who are thought to have taken part in the raid and those who ordered the attack, were ranked by the prosecutor according to their level of responsibility for the raid. A diagram was then sent to Israeli authorities through the Turkish Justice Ministry for confirmation, but Tel Aviv did not respond to the confirmation request, the daily said. Bugün adds that following this development, the prosecutor took action for the arrest of the 174 Israelis and applied to the Justice Ministry.

The İstanbul Prosecutor’s Office, however, had earlier denied reports that Ekinci asked MİT to identify Israeli soldiers and commanders involved in the attack and said the list of Israelis — reportedly prepared as a result of a Facebook search — was drawn up by the Humanitarian Aid Foundation (İHH), the Turkish charity that owned the raided ship.

Eight Turks and a Turkish-American were killed aboard the Mavi Marmara, a Turkish ship that was part of an international humanitarian aid flotilla which tried to break the Israeli blockade of Gaza in May of last year. A United Nations report about the raid, released last month, stated that activists on board the Mavi Marmara had attacked the raiding naval commandos. It went on to describe the blockade of Gaza as legitimate, although it also accused Israel of using disproportionate force against activists.

Turkey rejected the report’s findings, saying it would never recognize the blockade’s legitimacy and insisted on an Israeli apology as well as compensation for the deaths as a precondition for the normalization of a relationship once seen as a cornerstone of regional stability. Turkish-Israeli tensions have continued to escalate since then, with Prime Minister Tayyip Erdoğan saying last month Turkish warships could be sent to the Eastern Mediterranean at any time and that Israel cannot do whatever it wants there. Turkey has also downgraded diplomatic ties with Israel and suspended all military agreements.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.