“INTERPOL Americas conference focuses on cooperation in combating transnational crime”

July 2, 2013

INTERPOL on July 1, 2013 released the following:

“WILLEMSTAD, Curaçao – INTERPOL’s 22nd Americas Regional Conference opened today in Curaçao with a focus on strengthening information sharing, collaboration and border management to more effectively combat transnational organized crime throughout the region and beyond.

Prime Minister of Curaçao, Ivar Asjes, attended the opening ceremony of the three-day meeting (1-3 July) which brings together nearly 70 senior law enforcement officials from 33 countries and five international organizations, to address crime issues ranging from terrorism, people smuggling and drug trafficking, to fugitive investigations and cybercrime.

Opening the conference, Curaçao’s Minister of Justice, Nelson Navarro, said the interchange of knowledge was very important.

“It is very difficult for small countries to cope with the costs involved in the fight against international crime, so cooperation between Justice Ministers and with INTERPOL on a structural basis is essential,” said Minister Navarro.

With Curaçao one of INTERPOL’s newest member countries, having joined the world police body in 2011, Chief of Curaçao’s Police Force, Commissioner Marlon Wernet, said it was important for the country to be part of the global law enforcement community.

“This conference organized in our country is a strong indication for our region and world, that we are more than willing and ready to work together with all member states of INTERPOL, local and international law enforcement agencies, to make and maintain our country, region and world safe and as free as possible from criminal activities,” said Commissioner Wernet. “There is no doubt that together we stand and divided we are weak and would fall.”

INTERPOL President Mireille Ballestrazzi said the conference was of crucial importance in sharing best practice and expertise in addressing both traditional and emerging transnational organized crime threats.

“It is our ability to work together which is key in maintaining our concerted and joint efforts to effectively tackle transnational crime,” said President Ballestrazzi, pointing to the need to reinforce cooperation already in place as well as identifying opportunities for additional partnerships.

“It is clear that an effective police force is one which adapts to the constantly evolving challenges, which is why training also forms an important part of INTERPOL’s support to member countries in their efforts in combating all forms of crime.”

In this respect, President Ballestrazzi emphasized the added value of INTERPOL’s Regional Bureaus in Buenos Aires and San Salvador which have enabled INTERPOL to build on its operational support to member countries in the region and beyond, pointing to recent operations targeting drug trafficking and trafficking in illicit goods and counterfeiting.

With expanding use and access to INTERPOL’s databases also high on the agenda, delegates will be updated on the INTERPOL Illicit Arms Records and tracing Management System (iARMS), the first international centralized system for reporting and querying lost, stolen, trafficked and smuggled firearms.

To date, 74 member countries, including 10 from the Americas region, have successfully connected to the system, which since 1 January this year has seen the addition of more than 273,000 records, making iARMS one of the fastest growing databases in the world.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL launches StudentZone – a new educational website

May 29, 2012

INTERPOL on May 29, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – What is a Red Notice? What types of databases are run by the world’s largest police organization? What is ‘the Case of the Black Tattoo’? All these questions and more are answered with the launch of StudentZone, INTERPOL’s new educational website.

Aimed at teenagers, the new site is also an educational resource for teachers and parents providing information about INTERPOL, its role and how it works with police in each of its 190 member countries in preventing and detecting international crime.

A core part of the new website is ‘INTERPOL Junior Officer – the Case of the Black Tattoo,’ a game where players take on the role of an INTERPOL officer travelling to locations worldwide, gathering clues to assist local police in tracking down an international gang involved in smuggling.

Through a series of mini-challenges, the player learns about various crime areas as well as INTERPOL’s different areas of expertise. Players must complete a range of tasks to close the case, and have the option of posting their score to compare rankings with other players via social networks.

INTERPOL’s Director of Cabinet, Roraima Andriani, who oversaw the project, said, “Every day, INTERPOL works with police around the world to fight all types of crime, and we have seen the increasing dangers posed to the public, and especially young people, through crimes committed via the Internet.

“However, it is important to remember that the Internet is simply a reflection of society and just as we consider school essential for children in the real world, education has an important role to play via the world wide web,” said Mrs Andriani.

“INTERPOL’s new educational website enables us to share the knowledge and expertise we have developed with our member countries to help children become better informed on how to protect themselves.

“StudentZone brings together two key areas of society, the police and young people. It supports students’ understanding of the world they are growing up in, and gives them an opportunity to develop a greater understanding about INTERPOL and law enforcement in an informative and entertaining way,” concluded Mrs Andriani.

Students in Lyon were the first to test the new website and game when INTERPOL’s Secretary General, Ronald K. Noble, visited the Cité Scolaire Internationale, where he met with a group of 15-17 year-olds.

Mr Noble led a discussion about the impact of different crimes and how they can be linked internationally, before the students played the game to see who could complete the challenges in the fastest time to try and attain the rank of Senior Officer.

“I was very impressed by the level of debate with the students, who demonstrated not only critical thought in relation to the questions, but also a genuine interest in the work done by INTERPOL and the implications of international crime,” said Secretary General Noble.

The students were awarded a certificate by Mr Noble and Mr Roland Debbasch, the Rhone region’s top-ranking education official, who together with the Rhone’s Academic Director, Jean-Louis Baglan, visited the school to support the INTERPOL initiative.

INTERPOL is currently translating the game into French, Spanish and Arabic. To play the game and test your investigative skills, visit:  http://www.interpol.int/studentzone”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call: mcnabb.mcnabbassociates

           Office Locations

Email:


Italy’s head of criminal police visits INTERPOL ahead of Rome General Assembly

January 16, 2012

INTERPOL on January 16, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – Italy’s Director General of Criminal Police and Deputy Director General of Public Security, Prefect Francesco Cirillo, today met with INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters to discuss security measures aimed at enhancing international cooperation against cross-border crime.

With Rome hosting the 81st INTERPOL General Assembly later this year (5-8 November), the visit by Prefect Cirillo provided an opportunity to review preparations for the conference which will cover key security issues such as transnational organized crime, human and drug trafficking, terrorism, corruption, cybercrime and stolen works of art.

The role of international law enforcement cooperation and the global tools and services INTERPOL provides its 190 member countries against international crime will top the conference agenda.

During his meeting with Prefect Cirillo, Secretary General Noble underlined Italy’s ‘strong leadership’ in international law enforcement cooperation, and said INTERPOL’s General Assembly in Rome was set to determine the international security agenda ‘at a time when globalization has seen the expansion and diversification of transnational crime’.

The General Assembly is composed of delegates appointed by the governments of member countries. As INTERPOL’s supreme governing body, it meets once a year and takes all the major decisions affecting general policy, the resources needed for international cooperation, working methods, finances and programmes of activities. It also elects the Organization’s Executive Committee. Each member country represented has one vote.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Making Interpol Relevant Again

September 7, 2011

The Wall Street Journal on September 5, 2011 released the following:

“Since 9/11, Leader Has Worked to Make the Organization Central to Member Nations’ Fight Against Terrorism
By DAVID PEARSON

PARIS—If the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, changed the way the world looks at terrorism, they also served as a wake-up call for Interpol, the world’s largest law-enforcement agency.

“Since that day, the lights have never gone out at Interpol,” Secretary-General Ronald K. Noble says.

A decade ago, Interpol was a slow, sleepy, unresponsive institution headquartered in Lyon, a French city better known for its cuisine than for law enforcement. The agency worked 9-5, five days a week and there was little sense among member countries that they were fighting a common war on terrorism.

Ronald Noble, at a June conference in Singapore, is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation to generate additional funding.

Prior to 9/11, by Mr. Noble’s own admission, Interpol had become “irrelevant”; it wasn’t taken seriously by countries engaged in fighting terrorists. In fact, Mr. Noble is still smarting from the fact that he was alerted to the World Trade Center attacks by a phone call from his brother in the U.S. telling him to switch on his TV, rather than from a law-enforcement agency asking for help.

Under Mr. Noble’s leadership over the past decade all that has changed. The organization is now the indispensable international clearinghouse for exchanging information on terrorists and other international criminals.

Ironically, just prior to 9/11, Mr. Noble had set in motion a major overhaul of the institution to make sure it stayed awake 24/7 to provide immediate assistance, to streamline its international alert system and to allow police forces around the world to be permanently connected to Interpol’s databases.

Contrary to popular belief, Interpol doesn’t have cross-border crime-fighting SWAT teams that can be scrambled into action, though it does send employees to countries that request help, for example in identifying disaster victims. Mr. Noble says he would shoot down any suggestion that Interpol should head up an international antiterrorist squad. “That would be a bad idea. Virtually no country would want that, and they shouldn’t want that,” he says, as sovereign states should be responsible for law enforcement on their own territories.

Interpol serves primarily as the nerve center for member countries’ law-enforcement agencies to exchange information on international crime. Its areas of expertise cover the gamut of criminal activity, including drugs and human trafficking; money laundering, intellectual property offenses, art theft, organized crime and cybercrime. But cracking down on international terrorism is now a major focus.

If Mr. Noble has one burning ambition, it is to plug the holes that allow terrorists and other criminals to travel unhindered using false documents. He’s been working toward that goal over the past decade, but he’s still only halfway there.

“Last year, there were half a billion searches of our database” of stolen or lost travel documents as travelers had their passports scanned by immigration officials, Mr. Noble says. “The same year there were a billion international arrivals. It means there were half a billion times when the passports of international arrivals were not screened against the only database of stolen passports.” Only 153 of Interpol’s 188 member countries are providing details—but not the names—on 23 million cancelled travel documents, and the U.S. only hooked up to the system in 2009. What particularly worries Mr. Noble is that only 44 countries—he won’t say which—regularly check passports against the Interpol database.

“What about the rest? There is no rational reason to explain why every country in the world isn’t connected and doesn’t screen. It certainly is not a reason based on cost,” he says. “Greater priority is currently being given to detecting passengers carrying mineral-water bottles than potential terrorists carrying stolen passports and that shouldn’t be the case.”

The 55-year-old son of a black American GI who met Mr. Noble’s German mother while on active service in Cold War Germany, he learned about hard work as a youngster while helping his father with his cleaning company business in New Jersey.

Ronald Noble attended the prestigious Stanford Law School and, after a stint as a federal prosecutor, taught at New York University School of Law before being nominated by former President Bill Clinton to head the U.S. Treasury’s law-enforcement division. He has led four of the eight main U.S. law-enforcement agencies, including the Secret Service, Customs and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

In 2000, Mr. Noble was elected by the representatives of the 188 member countries to head Interpol, billeted in a massive concrete, steel and glass cube overlooking the Rhône river. Last year, he was elected to a third five-year term.

With its annual budget of about €60 million ($85 million)—less than the cost of a small Airbus jet—Interpol is woefully underfunded for the job that it has to do, Mr. Noble feels. “The priority for Interpol in the next five, 10 or 20 years should be to make sure we have a structure and system in place for sharing crime-related information that’s linked to the internet, to make sure we know who’s behind the click of a mouse or the sending or receiving of a message. To achieve that will require a great deal of money and commitment on the part of our member countries,” he says.

How much? “It should be €1 billion a year. You look at the hundreds of billions of dollars governments spend each year on foreign aid and when you think about which element of foreign aid should be of paramount importance, the answer must be the security of countries and businesses and citizens,” he says. A massive increase in Interpol’s resources “will help us prevent organized crime groups from proliferating in the next 10 years like they have in the past 10 years,” he adds.

At a time when cash-strapped governments are tightening their purse strings, Interpol clearly isn’t going to get the funding it would like from governments’ mandatory contributions. So Mr. Noble is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation that would channel a revenue stream from private users, for example from airlines and banks that routinely scan the passports of their passengers or customers. Some say they would gladly pay a few pennies per scan for peace of mind that the documents aren’t listed as stolen or lost. “This could save airlines, banks and hotels hundreds of millions of dollars a year in gained cost efficiencies and reduced risk while generating ten or so millions of dollars a year in revenue that Interpol could use for enhanced border security world-wide,” he says.

Mr. Noble said he has told Interpol’s membership that he won’t seek a fourth term. “I believe the best thing that I can do for the U.S. and all countries is to complete my mandate here at Interpol and then go back to teaching law.” Mr. Noble has a standing tenure for his professorship at NYU, which has allowed him to carry on his other activities while giving him credit for a summer law course that he teaches at the National University of Singapore.

His commitment to Interpol borders on the obsessive. “Over the last 10 years, Interpol is almost all I’ve been,” he says. A self-confessed workaholic, he frequently puts in working days of 14 hours or more and is often on the road, visiting member countries. “I’ve been trained to lead by example,” he says. Indeed, he is so married to his job that he has an apartment adjoining his office. “There is always a country’s head of police or head of terrorism or head of some unit who’s awake, and I can always be reached with my BlackBerry.”

Such a punishing regime comes at a cost, however, in terms of personal relationships and health. “It’s impossible to have a decent family life with hours like that,” he admits. “Now, for the health of my body and mind and a host of other reasons I regularly take time off, which I didn’t do before,” he says, adding that he now meditates and does yoga.

Although being the head of Interpol means that he’s a high-profile target, Mr. Noble takes that in his stride, relying on the countries that he visits to look after his security. But he has grumbled in the past about being harassed at border controls because of his appearance. “I know that I’ve been stopped at borders because I fit various profiles. I look like a person who could be Arabic, if I’m travelling from an Arab country; I could look like a drug-trafficker if I’m coming from a drugtrafficking country, or I could look like an illegal immigrant when I’m coming from a variety of countries,” he said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL Seminar Focuses on Transnational Organized Crime

February 24, 2011

Identifying, targeting and dismantling transnational organized crime groups involved in the manufacture and distribution of counterfeit goods is the focus of the 7th INTERPOL Intellectual Property Crime Training Seminar in cooperation with the Procuraduria General de la Republica (PGR), the Agencia Federal de Investigaciones (AFI), the Instituto Mexicano de la Propiedad Industrial (IMPI) and the World Customs Organization.

More than 90 police, customs and regulatory body officers from Mexico, Guatemala and Belize with experts from Brazil, Colombia and the U.S. are taking part in the five-day training program (February 21-25) at the AFI headquarters in Mexico City, supported by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

The seminar, delivered by INTERPOL’s Intellectual Property (IP) Rights program, with the participation of the Universal Post Union, will deliver cutting-edge training aimed at equipping investigators with the necessary skills to effectively combat current and emerging threats from IP crime.

In addition to being the first of a series of training activities for Central America and Mexico, it will also provide a launch pad for further developments of INTERPOL’s IPR program beyond the Americas region, which has already seen significant developments in combating transnational organized IP crime since its launch in 2005.

INTERPOL has many initiatives relating to transnational crimes. Organized crime is a high-priority for INTERPOL due to the many areas it involves.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL Hosts 21st African Regional Conference

February 17, 2011

INTERPOL’s 21st African Regional Conference which opened yesterday will review security priorities for Africa and seek to boost the region’s operations against transnational crime through greater law enforcement cooperation between countries in the region and beyond.

With human and drug trafficking, maritime piracy, terrorism, counterfeit medicines and wildlife crime topping the agenda, the three-day meeting (February 16-18) will gather more than 150 senior law enforcement officials from some 40 countries and seven international organizations and focus on strengthening the ability of police to undertake cross-border operations by enhancing resources and expanding access to INTERPOL’s global tools and services.

As part of the conference, INTERPOL is calling for Africa and other regions to adopt a strong and united front against international crime in a globalized world.

With INTERPOL’s four Regional Bureaus in Africa – in Abidjan, Harare, Nairobi and Yaoundé – facilitating police cooperation and working with key bodies such as the Regional Police Chiefs Committees, the Commonwealth and the African Union, INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble underlined the importance of ‘empowering’ law enforcement through capacity building ‘to develop the police of tomorrow’.

To view INTERPOL’s press release in its entirety, please click here.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Litigation, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Litigation.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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