“Anti-Whaling Activist Paul Watson Marks a Year of Fleeing on the Sea”

July 17, 2013

motherboard.vice.com on July 16, 2013 released the following:

“By Ben Richmond

Just as Edward Snowden is caught in the in-between-nation zone of a Moscow airport, the anti-whaling activist Paul Watson is caught in a nation-free life at sea. Watson hasn’t been into a port since fleeing Germany in July last year in order to keep himself from being extradited to Japan.

Watson is the founder of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, which fights to preserve marine life most famously by directly disrupting whaling operations. The group’s aggressive actions have earned it attention from the public, via the Animal Planet show Whale Wars, and from governments, including those of the United States, Canada, and Japan, which calls them eco-terrorists.

Last known to be aboard the Sea Shepherd ship the MY Steve Irwin when it confronted Japanese ships in the Southern Ocean in February, Watson’s exact whereabouts are currently unknown. Still, for being a refugee, Watson maintains a fairly high media profile. He regularly gives interviews about Sea Shepard’s actions and also his own tenuous situation.

Legal trouble has been a defining trait for the man who describes himself as a “pirate of compassion.” The origins of his life-on-the-lam span continents and decades. In 2002, Watson and a Sea Shepherd ship was sailing through Guatemalan waters when they came across a Costa Rican vessel that was slicing fins off of sharks.

According to Peter Hammarstedt, a spokesman for Sea Shepherd, they called the authorities and took control of the fishing ship, only to have the Guatemalans show up with a gunboat to arrest Watson. The Sea Shepherd fled to Costa Rica, where Watson was charged with “violating navigational regulations.” The charges were dropped, and then reinstated.

Ten years later, Watson was detained at an airport in Frankfurt on behalf of Costa Rica. While being detained, it occurred to Watson that the Japanese—his longtime arch nemeses—might be behind the arrest, not Costa Rica. “We have created some very powerful enemies in the Japanese government,” Hammarstedt told The New York Times, and also said that Watson thought the Japanese were behind the arrest.

So when Watson was released on bail, he fled rather than risk extradition. “I decided I know if I go to Japan I’m not going to be released, ever. So I left Germany,” he told CTV. To review, Watson was arrested in Germany on charges by Costa Rica, for actions in Guatemalan waters, potentially as just a front for the Japanese.

A month after he took to the sea, Interpol issued a red notice at Costa Rica’s behalf. They issued another red notice a month later on behalf of Japan, on charges of breaking in and damaging a whaling ship in 2010. Whether or not he would extradited to Japan before, he almost definitely would now.

The international criminal co-operation system makes any port, save for the least savory, potentially dangerous, according to Robert Currie, a law professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax.

“He could very well be arrested in quite a large number of countries and the countries where he couldn’t get arrested are probably countries where he wouldn’t want to go,” Currie told CTV.

And so Watson wanders the high seas, transferring from ship to ship in international waters, unable to see his daughter and grandchildren in Seattle. Like Snowden, he is a man who cannot safely enter or leave a country. That must suck. But the open seas still sound better than being stuck in an airport.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“INTERPOL targets escaped French gangster Redoine Faid with Red Notice”

April 18, 2013
Redoine Faid Red Notice
Redoine Faid Red Notice Picture

INTERPOL on April 15, 2013 released the following:

“World police body supporting international manhunt for convicted robber who blasted his way out of prison

LYON, France – An INTERPOL Red Notice or international wanted persons alert has been issued for one of France’s most notorious criminals, Redoine Faid, who escaped from a detention centre near Lille after setting off a series of explosions and taking four guards hostage.

The global alert was sent to all 190 member countries just hours after the breakout on Saturday and included identifying information such as the photograph and fingerprints of the convicted armed robber in order to assist national law enforcement to identify him.

In addition to his convictions for a series of armed robberies, 40-year-old Faid is suspected of involvement in a robbery in 2010 in which a policewoman was killed during a shootout and is also wanted in connection with the attempted murder of an officer of the Gendarmerie Nationale.

INTERPOL’s Fugitive Investigative Support (FIS) unit at its General Secretariat headquarters is now liaising closely with French authorities in order to ensure that any information on Faid’s whereabouts is shared as a high priority.

INTERPOL’s Executive Director of Police Services, Jean-Michel Louboutin said the decision by its National Central Bureau in Paris to make the Red Notice publicly available would significantly assist law enforcement in locating the escaped prisoner.

“Redoine Faid is clearly a dangerous individual and INTERPOL is providing all necessary support to ensure that he is back behind bars as quickly as possible,” said Mr Louboutin.

“INTERPOL’s Red Notice is a powerful law enforcement tool that can assist police in locating and apprehending individuals who pose a threat to public safety and security, which is clearly the case here. France’s request for INTERPOL to issue a Red Notice dramatically increases the likelihood of Faid’s arrest, no matter where he attempts to evade justice,” added Mr Louboutin.

Faid should be considered armed and dangerous and members of the public are advised not to approach him, and to pass any information to their local or national police.

A Red Notice can be requested by any INTERPOL member country and is issued by INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters. It is placed in INTERPOL’s central database which can be queried by any member country, and can also be added to foreign law enforcement databases and border lookout systems.

Many INTERPOL member countries view a Red Notice as the basis for the provisional arrest of a wanted person with a view to their extradition. Issued in all four of INTERPOL’s official languages ‒ Arabic, English, French and Spanish ‒ a Red Notice remains in effect until the wanted fugitive is extradited.”

Redoine Faid’s Red Notice

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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“INTERPOL Chief Libya mission to advance recovery of stolen assets during Gaddafi regime”

March 19, 2013

INTERPOL on March 18, 2013 released the following:

“Assistance in locating and extraditing wanted Libyan fugitives also high on agenda

TRIPOLI, Libya – Identifying how INTERPOL can provide additional assistance in the recovery of assets stolen during the Gaddafi regime and help enhance national and regional security were key issues during a meeting between INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble and Prime Minister Ali Zeidan.

With Secretary General Noble also meeting Interior Minister Ashour Shuwail and Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz, high on the agenda of Mr Noble’s two-day mission (16 and 17 March) was INTERPOL’s active role in helping Libya identify, locate and extradite fugitives through the publication of Red Notices, or international wanted persons alerts.

“As Libya continues to rebuild its infrastructure following the 2011 overthrowing of Gaddafi, INTERPOL member countries can help Libya track down not only fugitives, but the millions if not billions in assets stolen by Colonel Gaddafi, his family and associates,” stated Secretary General Noble.

Libya’s Prime Minister Zeidan, Foreign Minister Abdelaziz, and Interior Minister Shuwail were united in their support of INTERPOL’s providing technical assistance and creating a joint public private task force that would collaborate with Libya to help track down and repatriate the assets looted from the country during the Gaddafi regime.

“These stolen assets need to be recovered so that ‘they can be made available to and for the benefit of the people of Libya’ as required by several UN Security Council resolutions. If INTERPOL is successful, then it will help Libya in its efforts to build a peaceful, secure, independent and free Libya,” concluded Mr Noble.

With security the highest priority in the country, the INTERPOL Chief’s visit comes just days after the inauguration of INTERPOL’s real-time passport screening system at Tripoli International Airport as part of international efforts to improve Libyan border security.

Under INTERPOL’s EUR 2.2 million Project RELINC (Rebuilding Libya’s Investigative Capability) funded by the EU, Libyan border control authorities can now directly access INTERPOL’s global database to detect stolen and lost passports, enabling the instant identification of persons seeking to conceal their true identity, including internationally wanted persons, suspected terrorists and transnational criminals.

The INTERPOL Chief’s visit also allowed him to emphasize INTERPOL’s ongoing efforts to help bring about the arrest of a number of fugitives subject to Red Notices issued at Libya’s request, including Colonel Gaddafi’s former director of military intelligence, Abdullah Al-Senussi, who was extradited to Tripoli from Mauritania in September last year as the most recent example of their success.

“INTERPOL’s Red Notices are proven effective tools in assisting member countries locate fugitives, no matter where they attempt to hide, and no matter how long ago the offence was committed,” said Secretary General Noble, pointing to the Red Notice issued for Faraj Al-Chalabi at Libya’s request in connection with the murder of two German nationals in 1994. One of Al-Chalabi’s co-accused was Osama bin Laden, who was also the subject of a Red Notice issued at Libya’s request.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Belgian police chief visit to INTERPOL looks to expand cooperation

October 24, 2012

INTERPOL on October 23, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – Identifying further areas of cooperation in which INTERPOL’s global tools and international law enforcement network can further support national and regional security was the focus of a visit to INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters today by Catherine De Bolle, Commissioner General of the Belgian Federal Police.

In meetings with Secretary General Ronald K. Noble and other senior INTERPOL officials, where a range of activities in which Belgium and INTERPOL work closely together was discussed, Commissioner De Bolle highlighted how cases in the areas of drug and vehicle trafficking, maritime piracy and violent crimes demonstrated the value of INTERPOL’s products and services to police in the field.

“I am strongly committed to enhancing information exchange through INTERPOL’s channels and the use of its global databases by the Belgian police forces,” said Belgium’s Federal Police Chief.

“Since crime does not stop at our borders, nor should the response to it. In this respect, the Belgian Federal Police supports efforts by INTERPOL to strengthen professional international police cooperation, including the establishment of the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore and the development of the West African Police Information System,” added Commissioner De Bolle.

The West African Police Information System (WAPIS), developed by INTERPOL is an EU-funded project initiated during Belgium’s presidency of the Council of the European Union in 2010. The project allows West African police to access and manage in a structured way police data related to organized crime by facilitating the collection, centralization, management, sharing and analysis of police information among countries belonging to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS).

Welcoming the visit to the world police body by Belgium’s Federal Police Commissioner as an opportunity to identify areas where Belgium and INTERPOL can collaborate ‘even more closely’, INTERPOL Secretary General Noble said: “During its long relationship with INTERPOL, the Belgian Federal Police has demonstrated its leadership in the area of international law enforcement cooperation and it is an essential partner to INTERPOL’s vision for a safer world.”

In this respect, the Head of INTERPOL recalled the ‘exemplary collaborative actions’ taken by Belgium’s Federal Police in the case of a Somali man suspected of maritime piracy who was extradited from the Seychelles to Belgium in May 2012 after a cross-check of his fingerprints against INTERPOL’s databases in March 2011 linked the suspect with the hijack of Belgian vessel MV Pompei in waters off the Seychelles in April 2009.

Immediately after the release of the hijacked vessel in June 2009, Belgian Federal Police conducted an extensive forensic crime scene investigation of the vessel and its results were added to INTERPOL’s maritime piracy and fingerprints databases.

Later, in March 2011, following the arrest of six Somali nationals in waters off the Seychelles, its police provided INTERPOL with the fingerprints of the individuals to be cross-checked with INTERPOL’s databases. The check revealed that the prints of one of the apprehended individuals matched latent marks seized by Belgian Federal Police on the hijacked Belgian vessel.

“A global collaborative approach to security involving countries sharing intelligence, connecting the dots and maximizing the use of INTERPOL’s global police tools is today key to effectively protecting citizens across regions and worldwide,” concluded Secretary General Noble.

Commissioner De Bolle was accompanied by Dirk Allaerts, Head of Cabinet, Peter De Buysscher, Director of International Police Cooperation, Michel Croquet, Director of Police Information Management and Head of INTERPOL’s National Central Bureau in Brussels, and Alain Barbier, Assistant Director in Brussels at the office of the Special Representative of INTERPOL to the European Union.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Man Wanted by Interpol Arrested After Allegedly Kidnapping Two Women From Jakarta Club

June 11, 2012

Jakarta Globe on June 11, 2012 published the following:

By: Zaky Pawas

“A Uzbek national wanted by Interpol for human trafficking was arrested by Jakarta Police on Monday after allegedly kidnapping two women working at a Central Jakarta nightclub.

Musaev Samir, 33, was arrested early Monday morning at his apartment at the Cibubur Residences in Bekasi. He reportedly kidnapped his ex-girlfriend Nadiya Dobos, an Uzbek national, and her Russian friend Anna Iyasereva. The two women were allegedly working as DJ at Illigals night club on Jalan Hayam Wuruk, Jakarta Police spokesman Sr. Comr. Rikwanto said.

“The suspect is an ex-boyfriend of the victim [Dobos] and on June 6, 2012, he told her to stop working at Illigals,” Rikwanto said.

Samir had offered Dobos $1,000 to quit her job at the club, but she reportedly refused, police said.

He then allegedly kidnapped Iyasereva on June 6 and threatened to kill her if Dobos refused to leave her job.

Dobos met Samir on June 7 and accompanied him to a mall and a hotel, police said.

On June 9, she asked Samir to take her back to the dormitory run by Illigals. He agreed, but reportedly threatened to kill Iyasereva if Dobos tried to run.

Dobos reported the kidnapping to the Illigals management and then ran. The night club called the Jakarta Police.

Police raided Samir’s home, finding Iyasereva and seizing a Range Rover, three expensive watches and a savings account ledger showing Rp 1 billion ($106,000) in his bank account.

“We’re tracking down where he got the money from. He made an account at BCA [Bank Central Asia] using a fake Indonesian ID card,” Adj. Sr. Comr. Helmy Santika of the Jakarta Police, said.

Samir has been wanted by Interpol since 2009 for people smuggling and sex trafficking. The Uzbek national allegedly trafficked women from Uzbekistan to Indonesia and other Asian countries, where they were sold into prostitution.

Interpol Indonesia officer First Insp. Yudhi Saroja said Samir would be tried in Indonesia for kidnapping, before he was extradited to Uzbekistan.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL assistance leads to first extradition from Seychelles of suspected maritime pirate

May 26, 2012

INTERPOL on May 25, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – A Somali man suspected of maritime piracy has been extradited from the Seychelles to Belgium after a cross-check of his fingerprints against INTERPOL’s databases linked the suspect with the hijack of Belgian vessel MV Pompei in waters off the Seychelles in April 2009.

The Belgian judicial authorities had requested the suspect’s extradition based on forensic evidence establishing the presence of the individual during the hijacking of the ship on 18 April 2009 when its 10 crew members from Belgium, Croatia, the Netherlands and the Philippines were taken hostage by 12 pirates.

Immediately after the release of the hijacked vessel on 28 June 2011, Belgian Federal Police conducted an extensive forensic crime scene investigation of the vessel and its results were added to INTERPOL’s maritime piracy and fingerprints databases.

On 26 March 2011, following the arrest of six Somali nationals in territorial waters off the Seychelles, its police then provided INTERPOL with the fingerprints of the individuals to be cross checked with INTERPOL’s databases within the framework of INTERPOL’s Project EVEXI. The check revealed that the prints of one of the apprehended individuals matched latent marks seized on the hijacked Belgian vessel.

Project EVEXI aims to establish procedures for building the capacity of six East African countries (Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Oman, the Seychelles and Tanzania) in maritime piracy intelligence gathering and forensic evidence collection.

“This case marks a major success in the cross border fight against maritime piracy and represents a blueprint for international cooperation with INTERPOL in the fight against maritime piracy and its networks,” said the Head of INTERPOL’s Maritime Piracy Task Force, Pierre St. Hilaire.

“International police cooperation with INTERPOL can lead to major outcomes in the international fight against maritime piracy using cross continental information exchange.”

“We congratulate authorities in the Seychelles and Belgium since this extradition was only made possible by their actions and outstanding cooperation with INTERPOL,” added Mr St Hilaire.

Hassan M.O. now faces judicial prosecution in a Belgian court.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

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Interpol seeks West Papuan tribal leader living in UK

November 28, 2011
Benny Wenda
Benny Wenda was issued with a red notice by Interpol at the request of the Indonesians

BBC News UK on November 24, 2011 released the following:

By Danny Shaw
Home affairs correspondent, BBC News

A tribal leader from an Indonesian province who has been granted asylum in the UK has been named on an Interpol wanted list, the BBC has learned.

Benny Wenda, who is 36 and living in Oxford, leads a movement for the independence of West Papua.

Indonesia wants to put him on trial for several offences he is alleged to have committed before he left, including murder and arson.

Mr Wenda said the charges were “made up” and politically motivated.

Charles Foster, a lawyer who is supporting Mr Wenda, said the move by the Indonesian authorities was designed to stop Mr Wenda arguing his case for independence.

West Papua is an Indonesian province on the western tip of the island of New Guinea.

Mr Foster said: “It’s plainly affecting his ability to go around the world, doing the job which he set himself and his people have set him, which is saying to Indonesia ‘you have an obligation to have a free and fair election in West Papua and that the continued annexation of West Papua, Indonesia, is illegal under international law’.”

The government accepted Mr Wenda’s asylum application in 2002 after hearing allegations he had been persecuted by the Indonesian authorities.

‘Riddled with corruption’

Mr Wenda had been arrested for his alleged involvement in an attack on a police station.

He claimed that during his detention he was held in appalling conditions and threatened and beaten by prison guards and intelligence officers, who had tried to kill him. His subsequent trial was said by an observer to be “riddled with corruption”.

However, Mr Wenda managed to escape from the country and fled to the UK, eventually settling in Oxford with his wife and six children, and was granted British citizenship.

It has now emerged that earlier this year he was issued with a red notice by Interpol at the request of the Indonesians.

A red notice acts as an alert to Interpol’s 190 member countries that an individual is wanted by another country.

Anyone subject to it can be arrested and is liable to be extradited.

In Mr Wenda’s case, Interpol said the red notice was issued by Papua Regional Police CID for “crimes involving the use of weapons/explosives”.

“When I saw this it really made me scared,” Mr Wenda told BBC News.

This is Indonesia watching me, even here. That was shocking me you know”

Mr Foster said travelling outside the UK would in future be “risky” for Mr Wenda.

“Whenever he goes across a border his name is likely to flash up on the screen of the immigration officials and he’s likely to be ushered into a little room for questioning,” he said.

“Of course, the politics of that country will determine to some extent what happens after that.”

‘Peaceful campaigner’
An Indonesian Embassy official said Mr Wenda belonged to a “clandestine organisation dedicated to secede from Indonesia using any means available to them” and was wanted on suspicion of offences including murder and arson.

Billy Wibisono, Third Secretary (Information and Socio-Cultural Affairs), said: “Mr Wenda and several other accomplices participated in an attack of the Abepura Police Station on 7 December 2000 and caused the deaths and destruction of property.”

He said six police officers and civilians died in the attack, and that several government buildings and other premises were damaged.

“Weapons, firearms and munitions were stolen from the police station,” Mr Wibisono said, adding that the red notice would be withdrawn if Mr Wenda “can prove his innocence in our court of law”.

Mr Wenda said the allegations were “completely made up” and that he had always been a peaceful campaigner for independence.

“I was not even in the country at the time and Indonesia could not find a single independent witness against me. It is these political-motivated charges that meant the UK gave me asylum but, years later, Indonesia is still threatening me with them,” he said.

Jago Russell, Chief Executive of Fair Trials International, which is backing Mr Wenda, is calling on Interpol to withdraw the red notice.

“There are a number of countries which are using Interpol red notices against political opponents, or freedom fighters, so clearly Indonesia is in the case of Benny Wenda,” said Mr Russell.

He said red notices had been issued on behalf of the Syrian and Iranian authorities and that Colonel Gaddafi used the scheme in Libya.

“There certainly is a pattern of it having been used for political purposes even though it is expressly stated in the constitution of Interpol that that’s not what it should be used for,” he said.

Interpol refused to comment on Mr Wenda’s case but released a statement saying that red notices were issued only when details of a valid arrest warrant were provided by the requesting country.

“Interpol’s role is not to question allegations against an individual, nor to gather evidence, so a red notice is issued based on a presumption that the information provided by the police is accurate and relevant,” it said.

The agency added red notices would be withdrawn where the information provided was insufficient or “not convincing”.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Battle to extradite Rwanda fugitives rages on

October 3, 2011

The East African on October 2, 2011 released the following:

“By A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT, The EastAfrican

Rwanda is coming under renewed global pressure to craft new strategies to arrest wanted genocide suspects from their hide outs ahead of next year’s UN court deadline.

Seventeen years after the 1994 genocide, at least 65 of the key masterminds remain at large despite efforts to track down genocide fugitives.

Concern is mounting ahead of the 2012 deadline when the mandate of the Arusha based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) — the UN court set up to deal with the atrocities — expires.

Nine of the most wanted genocide masterminds remain at large, with a bounty of $5 million each on their head under the US Rewards for Justice Programme since 2004.

Despite the incentive, some of the most wanted suspects remain untouched; notable among them is Felicien Kabuga, an alleged financier of the Rwanda genocide who has been rumoured to be hiding in Kenya.

Only 32 fugitives have been arrested by Interpol out of the over 97 red notices (arrest warrants) issued.

“It’s a huge problem.

They also have access to resources that allow them to hide from capture. But just to remind you; it took 10 years to track down Osama bin Laden,” said Ronald Noble, the Secretary General of Interpol, adding there was a need for a new strategy to fast track the arrest of the fugitives who have become “more elusive.”

“The fugitives usually move under false names and travel documents to evade arrest with 10 genocide suspects so far arrested with false documents,” he said. However, the Interpol chief observed that with increasing regional and cross-border cooperation among countries, progress has been made towards limiting the movements of the fugitives, citing recent arrests of genocide fugitives in Uganda and DRC.

However, Rwanda is on the verge of achieving a major breakthrough as several European countries holding fugitives have finally looked into the possibility of extraditing the suspects to face trial in Rwanda.

Among countries Rwanda has been involved in a long-standing debate with requests to have suspects extradited home are France, Sweden, Norway, Finland, the Netherlands and Denmark.

The argument has been that Rwanda does not have competent courts to accord extradited individuals a fair trial, a claim Rwanda dismisses.

“We have always been ready. Our position is clear, we are ready to take on these cases,” Rwanda’s Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga said.

Several requests, including some to the Arusha-based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), have been turned down in the past on the same grounds. However, earlier this year, some countries including Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden and the ICTR itself, began to give in, agreeing to the argument that Rwanda has made some major reforms in the judiciary and can try some of these cases.

Norway has said it would extradite Charles Bandora, a genocide suspect who roamed several African countries before ending up in the Scandinavian country, but he appealed the decision in the European Human Rights Court (EHRC), which is yet to decide.

The Netherlands on the other hand has appreciated several reforms in the justice sector, some of which it finances, but it is yet to extradite any of the several suspects in Dutch jails. It will all depend on the EHRC.

The same is the case with Sylvere Ahorugeze in Sweden.

But then, just as Rwanda braces itself for the first ever extraditions from a European country, human rights watchdogs including Human Right Watch (HRW), Amnesty International and the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI) are opposing the development. The groups have argued before the Strasbourg-based European court that Rwanda does not yet have a judiciary that is independent enough to accord the fugitives a fair trial.

“In theory, Rwanda is reforming its judiciary, but in practice those measures are still insufficient,” Carina Tertsakian from Human Rights Watch told the International Justice Tribune.

Ms Tertsakian, whose work permit was cancelled in April last year by Rwanda immigration authorities, and the representatives of Amnesty International and CHRI argue that the trials of the suspects risk being “politicised,” once transferred to Rwanda.

Mr Ngoga, however, dismissed the allegations, instead accusing the rights group of attempting to derail a process that was reaching a “promising stage.”

Mr Ngoga insists that organisation such as HRW, which has had a number of run-ins with the Rwandan government and Amnesty International, are determined to frustrate efforts to ensure justice takes its course.

“These organisations are always ready and opportunely present to oppose every initiative that would bring back to Rwanda genocide fugitives,” Mr Ngoga said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

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