“INTERPOL to host largest-ever gathering of Ministers to address contemporary violence issues”

November 2, 2012

INTERPOL on November 1, 2012 released the following:

“ROME, Italy – INTERPOL’s General Assembly will bring together Justice, Home Affairs and Security Ministers from some 110 countries for the largest ever such gathering, which will focus on criminal violence issues ranging from human trafficking to terrorist activities.

The Ministerial meeting, which marks the beginning of the four-day (5 – 8 November) conference in Rome, Italy with the theme ‘Challenges for Police Facing Contemporary Violence’ will bring to the table senior government officials from around the globe.

INTERPOL’s Secretary General Ronald K. Noble stated, “This unprecedented gathering of ministers combined with our General Assembly will provide strong support for greater global cooperation in confronting ever-increasing and wide-ranging violent criminal activities.

“Transnational criminal violence is expanding, profiting from developments in technology and international economic challenges. Reduced budgets for law enforcement in far too many nations necessitates even greater levels of mutual support across borders in our continued efforts towards a safer world,” concluded the INTERPOL Chief.

A joint Ministerial outcome declaration will be issued at the conclusion of the day’s discussions, to identify viable policies and strategies which can be adapted to the unique security situations of cities, nations and regions, supported by greater shared intelligence and increased use of INTERPOL’S comprehensive databases covering a wide range of multi-national criminal activities.

INTERPOL is the largest international police organization with 190 member countries. Its work supports local national and regional law enforcement in a range of crime areas including; terrorism, organized crime, environmental crime, war crimes, maritime piracy, trafficking in illicit goods, weapons smuggling, human trafficking, money laundering, child sexual abuse, corruption and cybercrime.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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INTERPOL European conference builds on regional strength to combat global crimes

May 8, 2012

INTERPOL on May 8, 2012 released the following:

“TEL AVIV, Israel – Developing innovative solutions through building on past experience is key in identifying and addressing future crime threats, chiefs of police and ministers from throughout Europe heard on the opening day of INTERPOL’s 41st European Regional Conference in Tel Aviv.

With transnational issues including cybercrime, terrorism, organized crime, human trafficking, illegal immigration and trafficking in illicit goods high on the agenda of the three-day meeting (8 – 10 May), some 110 senior law enforcement officials from 49 countries and eight international organizations will discuss how to build on regional cooperation and expertise to boost global security.

The Commissioner of the Israeli Police, Inspector General Yohanan Danino, said INTERPOL provided a network of cooperation between the police forces of the world.

“Our language, our uniform and our badges may differ, but the message is the same, we are all committed to the same cause which is the essence of our work, which is to serve.

“This INTERPOL meeting which brings together senior European law enforcement officials will provide us with a stronger platform for our joint efforts in tackling crime and terrorism,” concluded Commissioner Danino.

Addressing the delegates, INTERPOL President Khoo Boon Hui said that learning from European expertise and experiences helps ensure that all INTERPOL member countries keep abreast of the latest trends and developments, particularly in combating cybercrime.

“Criminal gangs now find that transnational and cybercrime are far more rewarding and profitable than other riskier forms of making money,” said INTERPOL President Khoo Boon Hui.

“Globalization and the development of the virtual world offer new and fertile grounds for criminals to ply their illegal trade and commit crimes.

“Our ability to address both known and unknown threats effectively and efficiently serves to further cement our Organization’s position as the leader in securing global safety, and in shaping the security landscape,” concluded President Khoo.

With the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation due to open its doors in Singapore in 2014, delegates will be updated on the close cooperation with Europol which will soon launch the European Cybercrime Centre, and how the two organizations are liaising to ensure the widest possible support to law enforcement regionally and globally.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

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Southeast Europe Police Chiefs contribution to regional and global security praised by INTERPOL Chief

April 25, 2012

INTERPOL on April 24, 2012 released the following:

“BUDVA, Montenegro – Addressing the Southeast Europe Police Chiefs INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble said that their example of dedication and resolve to work together was an example of what can be achieved in combating regional transnational crime.

Speaking at the joint International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/Southeast Europe Police Chiefs Association (SEPCA) Cyber Crime Conference and SEPCA General Assembly, the head of the world police body pointed to the expansion of access to INTERPOL’s databases beyond the National Central Bureaus (NCBs) in all nine SEPCA member countries as the model for other regions of the world.

Law enforcement officers in key locations across Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania and Serbia can now carry out instant checks against INTERPOL’s databases.

In 2011, countries in the SEPCA region performed 50 million checks against INTERPOL’s Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database, triggering more than 3,000 alarms for people attempting to travel on a fraudulent document. A further 22 million checks on individuals were carried out, enabling officers to obtain critical policing information on nearly 25,000 persons known to law enforcement around the world.

Secretary General Noble said that the joint conference with IACP on cybercrime also clearly demonstrated the region’s recognition of the need to tackle crime in the virtual world is well as ensuring effective policing on the ground.

“Cybercrime is the challenge of tomorrow and one which will force us to reinvent the traditional business model of police as the expertise necessary to combat this type of crime will reside more in the private sector,” said Mr Noble, adding that INTERPOL was already putting measures in place to help its 190 member countries address this threat.

“The INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation, which will open its doors in Singapore in 2014, will include an ‘innovation, research and digital security’ unit which will work with INTERPOL’s 190 member countries and the private sector to develop innovative solutions to tackle cybercrime.

“The commitment and vision of the police chiefs in Southeast Europe will ensure that SEPCA will be among the key players in contributing to the global security of tomorrow,” concluded the INTERPOL Chief.

During his meeting with Prime Minister Igor Lukšić, Secretary General Noble commended Montenegro’s NCB in Podgorica for having implemented so many of INTERPOL’s tools and services that help to keep Montenegrins and visitors safe.

Mr Noble also agreed that Montenegro would become the second country in the world where INTERPOL would deploy a special support team during the summer tourist season when the population in Budva grows from 20,000 to 100,000 persons in order to ensure that Montenegrin police have quick access to information about foreign tourists should the need arise.

“Montenegro has proved time and time again that it is committed to close international police cooperation via INTERPOL which enhances both security and the continued development of its country,” concluded Secretary General Noble.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Media invitation for 41st European Regional Conference in Israel

April 12, 2012

INTERPOL on April 11, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – Senior law enforcement officials from throughout Europe will gather in Tel Aviv, Israel from 8 – 10 May for the 41st INTERPOL European Regional Conference.

The conference will focus on a range of international crime issues including:

  • combating maritime piracy
  • trafficking in human beings and illegal immigration
  • cybercrime
  • fighting organized crime and terrorism
  • developments in INTERPOL/European Union cooperation

The opening ceremony and speeches by INTERPOL President Khoo Boon Hui and high ranking Israeli officials will be open to the media at 10am on Tuesday 8 May.

A press conference will be held immediately after the opening ceremony at approximately 11am, in which senior INTERPOL and Israeli officials will participate.

The conference itself is closed to the media, however there will be a press briefing and opportunities for interviews with specialist officers from INTERPOL. Press releases will also be issued and made available on the INTERPOL website http://www.interpol.int, as well as speeches.

Journalists wishing to attend the event should complete the official press accreditation form and send it by email with a colour photo (JPEG format) no later than Tuesday 1 May to the communications department of the Israeli Police dovrut@police.gov.il

Media attending the opening ceremony must bring valid identity documents to the venue.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


INTERPOL-EU ties securing borders & preventing crime

March 21, 2012

Uploaded by INTERPOLHQ to YouTube on March 20, 2012 released the following:

INTERPOL-EU ties securing borders & preventing crime

“INTERPOL: Interview with Cecilia Malmstrom, EU Home Affairs Commissioner. 15 March 2012

INTERPOL a key partner for a secure Europe, says EU Commissioner Malmström

LYON, France — A secure Europe needs global law enforcement support, with INTERPOL a key partner in meeting security challenges, European Commissioner for Home Affairs Cecilia Malmström told police chiefs at the closing of the INTERPOL Heads of National Central Bureaus conference.

Addressing the 270 senior police officials from 148 countries, Commissioner Malmström said that to effectively fight organized crime and cybercrime, which pose the greatest risks to EU security, the need for partnerships with countries beyond Europe is essential.

“INTERPOL, with its National Central Bureaus in 190 member countries is a key partner for the European Union in addressing these global threats,” said Commissioner Malmström.

“Day-to-day cooperation between INTERPOL and police forces in the EU member states goes back many years and is invaluable in linking EU criminal intelligence with INTERPOL’s databases and global network.”

Highlighting the need for close cooperation in tackling these shared threats, the Commissioner explained her plans to establish a European Cybercrime Centre to work closely with the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore, which will include a state-of-the-art facility for boosting cyber security and countering cybercrime, to assist in the streamlining of regional and global investigations.

An important element in the enhanced cooperation between the two organizations was the opening of the INTERPOL liaison office in Brussels in 2009. Pierre Reuland, the Special Representative of INTERPOL to the European Union, said that ‘when it comes to global police cooperation INTERPOL is the natural partner to link EU member countries and agencies to the rest of the world’.

In meetings with Secretary General Ronald K. Noble and other senior INTERPOL officials, Commissioner Malmström discussed a range of activities where the EU and INTERPOL work closely together, particularly under the EU’s Internal Security Strategy.

“INTERPOL is working closer than ever with European bodies such as Europol, Frontex, Cepol and Eurojust in crime areas as diverse as maritime piracy, human trafficking and counterfeiting,” said Secretary General Noble.

“The European Union has recognized INTERPOL’s unique capacity to supplement law enforcement efforts at the European level, particularly in the effective management of borders where transnational criminals are at their most vulnerable,” added the INTERPOL Chief.

An EU-funded programme has seen expansion of access to INTERPOL’s unique global database of Stolen and Lost Travel Documents throughout the Commonwealth of Independent States, Southeast Asia, Africa and the Americas, helping to secure borders and identify criminals attempting to enter Europe, and elsewhere, using false identities.

Plans for the West African Police Information System (WAPIS) being developed with INTERPOL and funded by the EU were also discussed during the high-level meeting. The WAPIS project will facilitate the collection, centralization, management, sharing and analysis of police information on a national, regional and global level to more effectively tackle crime areas such as drug trafficking, illegal immigration, money laundering and weapons trafficking.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Italy’s head of criminal police visits INTERPOL ahead of Rome General Assembly

January 16, 2012

INTERPOL on January 16, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – Italy’s Director General of Criminal Police and Deputy Director General of Public Security, Prefect Francesco Cirillo, today met with INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters to discuss security measures aimed at enhancing international cooperation against cross-border crime.

With Rome hosting the 81st INTERPOL General Assembly later this year (5-8 November), the visit by Prefect Cirillo provided an opportunity to review preparations for the conference which will cover key security issues such as transnational organized crime, human and drug trafficking, terrorism, corruption, cybercrime and stolen works of art.

The role of international law enforcement cooperation and the global tools and services INTERPOL provides its 190 member countries against international crime will top the conference agenda.

During his meeting with Prefect Cirillo, Secretary General Noble underlined Italy’s ‘strong leadership’ in international law enforcement cooperation, and said INTERPOL’s General Assembly in Rome was set to determine the international security agenda ‘at a time when globalization has seen the expansion and diversification of transnational crime’.

The General Assembly is composed of delegates appointed by the governments of member countries. As INTERPOL’s supreme governing body, it meets once a year and takes all the major decisions affecting general policy, the resources needed for international cooperation, working methods, finances and programmes of activities. It also elects the Organization’s Executive Committee. Each member country represented has one vote.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


A UNITED DEFENSE

September 29, 2011

The Independent on September 28, 2011 released the following:

“BY JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE

Cybercrime and child trafficking amongst dominant threats at EAPCCO summit

There was no shortage of security threats to discuss during the 13th Eastern African Police Chief’s Cooperation Organisation (EAPCCO) General Assembly that was held in Kigali from September 11 to 16. The forum, which was established as an effective way of improving international police cooperation in combating transnational crimes amongst 11 countries in the region—Rwanda, Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Uganda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, and Tanzania —was also attended by the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL).

The region has seen its share of security challenges over the years, including the presence of insurgent groups such as the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the Forces for the Defense and Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR). Although the meeting touched on other areas of concern such as the apprehension of genocide suspects and cross border trafficking of small arms, there were other threats that rightfully garnered considerable attention as well.

Cybercrime was at the top of the list. As broadband networks continue to expand throughout the region there is growing concern that without adequate security, hackers will be able to infiltrate sensitive networks, such as those belonging to banks and government ministries. “We are getting the service but there is not enough skill to protect us from hackers,” explains an IT expert in Rwanda who asked to remain anonymous. “Just ten days ago a government website was hacked.”

To minimise such incidents, says the source, there has to be greater focus in passing cybercrime legislation—something Rwanda is in the midst of processing—and greater investment in training people in network security. “IT is still developing,” he says. “Even in the US there is still a lack of formal training for security.”

However, with the opening of a Carnegie Mellon campus in Kigali next year, these needed skills will be offered. Students from all over the region will be invited to attend classes given by Carnegie Mellon professors who are well-versed in the area. Moreover, the Rwandan government will be providing scholarships for its own students to encourage their enrolment at the school.

Trafficking counterfeit pharmaceuticals, according to Interpol officials, also poses a serious threat to the region. An INTERPOL-led operation entitled Mamba III, conducted in 2010 across East Africa, netted 10 tones of counterfeit and illicit medical products, including 90 kilos in Rwanda, and led to the arrest of more than 80 illegal manufacturers.

According to John Patrick Mwesigye, the coordinator of the pharmacy task force in the ministry of health, most counterfeit medical products that reach Rwanda are smuggled from the Democratic Republic of Congo and Burundi and consequently end up in the bordering western districts of Rusizi, Karongi and Rubavu.

However, Mwesigye says serious measures have been put into place to ensure the provision of safe and effective medicines. “44 companies are now permitted to supply pharmaceuticals and we make sure they keep in mind all regulations including quality and efficiency of what they import,” he says.

Mwesige, nevertheless acknowledges that Rwanda still lacks medical product quality control laboratories, but says there are plans to set them up in the next 15 months. “All we need in terms of financial means are available,” he says. “We are ready to start construction activities.”

But Rwanda’s borders are vulnerable to more than just counterfeit drugs; according to Vicent Mpunga who is in charge of the revenue protection department at Rwanda and Uganda’s Kagitumba border, opium and Waragi also find their way through porous areas of the border.

Moreover, Interpol findings show that since 2006 over 15000 motor vehicles have been checked against Interpol’s stolen motor vehicle database in the Eastern African region.

Tragically, people, most often vulnerable women and children are also trafficked across borders. According to the US State Department’s 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report, Rwanda was reported to be amongst a number of countries that serve as the source and to a lesser extent a destination country for women and children subjected to forced labor and sex.

The same report points out that this trafficking is facilitated by organized prostitution networks through which women supply other women or girls to clients staying at hotels. According to the report, Rwandan children are recruited and transported to Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania, where they are subjected to forced agricultural labor, domestic servitude and child prostitution.

The Rwandan Director for International Cooperation Chief Superintendent Elisa Kabera says that the police are still struggling to identify and respond to suspected cases of human trafficking but that tactics such as a hotline to report such cases have been developed.

Moreover, Interpol has also pledged to work with EAPCCO by providing it with access to its I-24/7 communications system. Through I-24/7, users can search through and share important data, including databases of suspected criminals or wanted persons, stolen and lost travel documents, stolen motor vehicles, fingerprints, DNA profiles and stolen administrative documents.

The I-24/7 will also prove invaluable for tracking down outstanding genocide suspects. During the 10th annual EAPCCO summit in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, in September 2007, the Council of Police Chiefs had recognized the gravity of genocide as a crime against humanity and included it in their joint cooperation arrangement.

Kabera says that Rwanda consequently established red notices for genocide fugitives in various countries. “We released red notices with pictures of genocide suspects,” he explains. “We did our job. Only the Interpol managed to arrest 32 of 97 on the red notice.”

Although some of the most wanted genocide fugitives such as Ildephonse Nizeyimana, Juvenal Rugambarara, and Callixte Nzabonimana, the former minister of youth in the government of Juvenal Habyarimana, have been apprehended in EAPCCO member states, others such Felicien Kabuga, accused of bankrolling and participating in the genocide, remain at large.

Bringing such individuals to justice will undoubtedly be a priority for Rwanda’s Inspector General of Police Emmanuel K. Gasana, who was elected to succeed his Sudanese counterpart, Gen. Hashim Al Hussein, as EAPCCO’s chairman for the next 12 months.

With the opening of the East African community Common Market in July 2010, movement of goods and people across EAC member states’ borders was made free. Although this policy will create many economic benefits it will also produce greater security risks. In much of the same as security requires the vigilance and participation of everyone, a lack of security can have adverse impacts on everyone as well.

“Our region’s lack of security is antagonising foreign trade and investment. Criminality has developed into an international phenomenon like globalisation. This also creates a big challenge for us to fight its threat to peace,” said Rwandan Prime Minister Bernard Makuza at the opening of the Council of Ministers responsible for police issues. “Given the nature and magnitude of this trans-border criminality, governments should work jointly to contain it because we can no longer afford to face our enemies individually.””

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Preventing the Next 9/11

September 8, 2011

International Herald Tribune (The Global Edition of the New York Times) on September 5-6, 2011 released the following:

“Opinion Editorial article by RONALD K. NOBLE

As we approach the 10th anniversary of the murder of thousands of citizens from more than 90 countries, I keep asking myself whether we are finally safe from the global terror threat.

Since those shocking attacks of 9/11, the death of Osama bin Laden, the elimination of terrorist training camps in Afghanistan and the concentrated international pressure on Al Qaeda have reshaped the nature of the threat confronting us.

We’ve seen terror attempts foiled by a combination of heightened security and awareness, improved intelligence gathering, robust enforcement by police and prosecutors, quick actions by an observant public and sheer luck: the “Detroit Christmas plot,” the “shoe bomber,” the Times Square bomber.

Yet we’ve also seen appalling carnage in Bali, Casablanca, Kampala, London, Madrid, Moscow and Mumbai and throughout Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan. Tragically, this list is far from exhaustive.

In my official visits to 150 countries, I have witnessed first-hand the transformation from the post-9/11 single-minded focus by governments and law enforcement on Al Qaeda and foreign-born terrorists, to today’s concerns about foreign criminals generally, and cybercrime and security more specifically.

The question as we look forward, therefore, is how can we protect our countries from Al Qaeda’s remaining elements and from other emerging serious criminal threats on the horizon?

What has become clear to me is that unprecedented levels of physical and virtual mobility are both shaping and threatening our security landscape. With more people traveling by air than ever before — one billion international air arrivals last year with national and international air passenger figures estimated to reach around three billion by 2014 — I see the systematic screening of the passports and names of those crossing our borders as a top priority.

Citizens now submitted to stringent physical security checks in airports worldwide would be incredulous to learn that 10 years after 9/11, authorities today still allow one-out-of-two international airline passengers to cross their borders without checking whether they are carrying stolen or lost travel documents.

Yet all the evidence shows us that terrorists exploit travel to the fullest, often attempting to conceal their identity and their past by using aliases and fraudulent travel documents.

This global failure to properly screen travelers remains a clear security gap, all the more deplorable when the information and technology are readily available. Currently, less than a quarter of countries perform systematic passport checks against Interpol’s database, with details of 30 million stolen or lost travel documents. This failure puts lives at risk.

But preventing dangerous individuals from crossing borders at airports is only half the challenge. At a time when global migration is reaching record levels — there were an estimated 214 million migrants in 2010 — I see a need for migrants to be provided biometric e-identity documents that can be quickly verified against Interpol’s databases by any country, anytime and anywhere. Verification prior to the issuance of a work or residence permit would facilitate the efficient movement of migrants while enhancing the security of countries.

Virtual mobility also throws up its own security challenges. In 2000, less than 400 million individuals were connected to the Internet; an estimated 2.5 billion people will be able to access the net by 2015.

Extensive use of the Internet and freely accessible email accounts allowed Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the principal architect of 9/11, to communicate quickly and effectively with co-conspirators.

A decade later, we see the same power targeting new generations to radicalize and spawn “lone wolf” terrorists. The trial in Germany of a young man who blamed online jihadist propaganda for the double murder he committed is just one recent example.

I believe that the Internet has replaced Afghanistan as the terrorist training ground, and this should concern us the most.

Cyberspace can be both a means for, and a target of terrorism and crime, undermining the critical infrastructure of governments and businesses. Yet until now there has been no meaningful effort to prepare countries to tackle this global threat in the future.

This is why Interpol’s 188 member countries unanimously approved the creation in Singapore of a global complex to better prepare the world to fight cybercrime and enhance cybersecurity.

So as we honor the memories of those who perished 10 years ago, it is time to ask ourselves if we have done all that we can to prevent another 9/11 or other serious attack. A great deal has been done to make us all safer, but far too little to make sure that we are safe from the global terror and criminal threat.

If we act today, in 10 years’ time, we may not just be catching up after the latest attack, we may have prevented it.

Ronald K. Noble is Secretary General of INTERPOL.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Making Interpol Relevant Again

September 7, 2011

The Wall Street Journal on September 5, 2011 released the following:

“Since 9/11, Leader Has Worked to Make the Organization Central to Member Nations’ Fight Against Terrorism
By DAVID PEARSON

PARIS—If the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, changed the way the world looks at terrorism, they also served as a wake-up call for Interpol, the world’s largest law-enforcement agency.

“Since that day, the lights have never gone out at Interpol,” Secretary-General Ronald K. Noble says.

A decade ago, Interpol was a slow, sleepy, unresponsive institution headquartered in Lyon, a French city better known for its cuisine than for law enforcement. The agency worked 9-5, five days a week and there was little sense among member countries that they were fighting a common war on terrorism.

Ronald Noble, at a June conference in Singapore, is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation to generate additional funding.

Prior to 9/11, by Mr. Noble’s own admission, Interpol had become “irrelevant”; it wasn’t taken seriously by countries engaged in fighting terrorists. In fact, Mr. Noble is still smarting from the fact that he was alerted to the World Trade Center attacks by a phone call from his brother in the U.S. telling him to switch on his TV, rather than from a law-enforcement agency asking for help.

Under Mr. Noble’s leadership over the past decade all that has changed. The organization is now the indispensable international clearinghouse for exchanging information on terrorists and other international criminals.

Ironically, just prior to 9/11, Mr. Noble had set in motion a major overhaul of the institution to make sure it stayed awake 24/7 to provide immediate assistance, to streamline its international alert system and to allow police forces around the world to be permanently connected to Interpol’s databases.

Contrary to popular belief, Interpol doesn’t have cross-border crime-fighting SWAT teams that can be scrambled into action, though it does send employees to countries that request help, for example in identifying disaster victims. Mr. Noble says he would shoot down any suggestion that Interpol should head up an international antiterrorist squad. “That would be a bad idea. Virtually no country would want that, and they shouldn’t want that,” he says, as sovereign states should be responsible for law enforcement on their own territories.

Interpol serves primarily as the nerve center for member countries’ law-enforcement agencies to exchange information on international crime. Its areas of expertise cover the gamut of criminal activity, including drugs and human trafficking; money laundering, intellectual property offenses, art theft, organized crime and cybercrime. But cracking down on international terrorism is now a major focus.

If Mr. Noble has one burning ambition, it is to plug the holes that allow terrorists and other criminals to travel unhindered using false documents. He’s been working toward that goal over the past decade, but he’s still only halfway there.

“Last year, there were half a billion searches of our database” of stolen or lost travel documents as travelers had their passports scanned by immigration officials, Mr. Noble says. “The same year there were a billion international arrivals. It means there were half a billion times when the passports of international arrivals were not screened against the only database of stolen passports.” Only 153 of Interpol’s 188 member countries are providing details—but not the names—on 23 million cancelled travel documents, and the U.S. only hooked up to the system in 2009. What particularly worries Mr. Noble is that only 44 countries—he won’t say which—regularly check passports against the Interpol database.

“What about the rest? There is no rational reason to explain why every country in the world isn’t connected and doesn’t screen. It certainly is not a reason based on cost,” he says. “Greater priority is currently being given to detecting passengers carrying mineral-water bottles than potential terrorists carrying stolen passports and that shouldn’t be the case.”

The 55-year-old son of a black American GI who met Mr. Noble’s German mother while on active service in Cold War Germany, he learned about hard work as a youngster while helping his father with his cleaning company business in New Jersey.

Ronald Noble attended the prestigious Stanford Law School and, after a stint as a federal prosecutor, taught at New York University School of Law before being nominated by former President Bill Clinton to head the U.S. Treasury’s law-enforcement division. He has led four of the eight main U.S. law-enforcement agencies, including the Secret Service, Customs and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

In 2000, Mr. Noble was elected by the representatives of the 188 member countries to head Interpol, billeted in a massive concrete, steel and glass cube overlooking the Rhône river. Last year, he was elected to a third five-year term.

With its annual budget of about €60 million ($85 million)—less than the cost of a small Airbus jet—Interpol is woefully underfunded for the job that it has to do, Mr. Noble feels. “The priority for Interpol in the next five, 10 or 20 years should be to make sure we have a structure and system in place for sharing crime-related information that’s linked to the internet, to make sure we know who’s behind the click of a mouse or the sending or receiving of a message. To achieve that will require a great deal of money and commitment on the part of our member countries,” he says.

How much? “It should be €1 billion a year. You look at the hundreds of billions of dollars governments spend each year on foreign aid and when you think about which element of foreign aid should be of paramount importance, the answer must be the security of countries and businesses and citizens,” he says. A massive increase in Interpol’s resources “will help us prevent organized crime groups from proliferating in the next 10 years like they have in the past 10 years,” he adds.

At a time when cash-strapped governments are tightening their purse strings, Interpol clearly isn’t going to get the funding it would like from governments’ mandatory contributions. So Mr. Noble is aiming to create an Interpol Foundation that would channel a revenue stream from private users, for example from airlines and banks that routinely scan the passports of their passengers or customers. Some say they would gladly pay a few pennies per scan for peace of mind that the documents aren’t listed as stolen or lost. “This could save airlines, banks and hotels hundreds of millions of dollars a year in gained cost efficiencies and reduced risk while generating ten or so millions of dollars a year in revenue that Interpol could use for enhanced border security world-wide,” he says.

Mr. Noble said he has told Interpol’s membership that he won’t seek a fourth term. “I believe the best thing that I can do for the U.S. and all countries is to complete my mandate here at Interpol and then go back to teaching law.” Mr. Noble has a standing tenure for his professorship at NYU, which has allowed him to carry on his other activities while giving him credit for a summer law course that he teaches at the National University of Singapore.

His commitment to Interpol borders on the obsessive. “Over the last 10 years, Interpol is almost all I’ve been,” he says. A self-confessed workaholic, he frequently puts in working days of 14 hours or more and is often on the road, visiting member countries. “I’ve been trained to lead by example,” he says. Indeed, he is so married to his job that he has an apartment adjoining his office. “There is always a country’s head of police or head of terrorism or head of some unit who’s awake, and I can always be reached with my BlackBerry.”

Such a punishing regime comes at a cost, however, in terms of personal relationships and health. “It’s impossible to have a decent family life with hours like that,” he admits. “Now, for the health of my body and mind and a host of other reasons I regularly take time off, which I didn’t do before,” he says, adding that he now meditates and does yoga.

Although being the head of Interpol means that he’s a high-profile target, Mr. Noble takes that in his stride, relying on the countries that he visits to look after his security. But he has grumbled in the past about being harassed at border controls because of his appearance. “I know that I’ve been stopped at borders because I fit various profiles. I look like a person who could be Arabic, if I’m travelling from an Arab country; I could look like a drug-trafficker if I’m coming from a drugtrafficking country, or I could look like an illegal immigrant when I’m coming from a variety of countries,” he said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Cybercrime focus of first joint INTERPOL and academia training programme

August 4, 2011

INTERPOL on August 2, 2011 released the following:

“DUBLIN, Ireland – Cybercrime investigators and computer forensic specialists from 21 countries are taking part in the first INTERPOL Cybercrime Summer School Training Course co-organized with University College Dublin (UCD).

The two-week programme (25 July – 5 August) is aimed at developing theoretical and practical knowledge and skills across a range of areas to assist investigators in conducting more effective cybercrime investigations:

  • Disk imaging
  • Live data forensics
  • Mobile phone forensics
  • Money laundering investigation
  • Search and seizure techniques
  • Voice over Internet protocol and wireless investigations
  • Malware detection and analysis

Also part of the training being delivered by professionals from both law enforcement, UCD and the private sector, are case simulation exercises enabling the students to incorporate these skills.

“In order to effectively fight against cybercrime it is important that law enforcement work with academia and the private sector which is why this course, the first co-organized by INTERPOL with the University College Dublin, is important,” said Jaime Ansieta, Assistant Director of INTERPOL’s Financial and High-Tech Crime unit.

“The joint law enforcement and academia training programme is a key element in providing exactly what law enforcement cybercrime investigators need” added Mr Ansieta who also thanked the An Garda Síochána for their support in facilitating the course.

INTERPOL has been working closely with the UCD since the signing of an agreement in 2009 to provide specialist training and academic exchanges to promote law enforcement e-crime investigation expertise.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN List Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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