“INTERPOL to host largest-ever gathering of Ministers to address contemporary violence issues”

November 2, 2012

INTERPOL on November 1, 2012 released the following:

“ROME, Italy – INTERPOL’s General Assembly will bring together Justice, Home Affairs and Security Ministers from some 110 countries for the largest ever such gathering, which will focus on criminal violence issues ranging from human trafficking to terrorist activities.

The Ministerial meeting, which marks the beginning of the four-day (5 – 8 November) conference in Rome, Italy with the theme ‘Challenges for Police Facing Contemporary Violence’ will bring to the table senior government officials from around the globe.

INTERPOL’s Secretary General Ronald K. Noble stated, “This unprecedented gathering of ministers combined with our General Assembly will provide strong support for greater global cooperation in confronting ever-increasing and wide-ranging violent criminal activities.

“Transnational criminal violence is expanding, profiting from developments in technology and international economic challenges. Reduced budgets for law enforcement in far too many nations necessitates even greater levels of mutual support across borders in our continued efforts towards a safer world,” concluded the INTERPOL Chief.

A joint Ministerial outcome declaration will be issued at the conclusion of the day’s discussions, to identify viable policies and strategies which can be adapted to the unique security situations of cities, nations and regions, supported by greater shared intelligence and increased use of INTERPOL’S comprehensive databases covering a wide range of multi-national criminal activities.

INTERPOL is the largest international police organization with 190 member countries. Its work supports local national and regional law enforcement in a range of crime areas including; terrorism, organized crime, environmental crime, war crimes, maritime piracy, trafficking in illicit goods, weapons smuggling, human trafficking, money laundering, child sexual abuse, corruption and cybercrime.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Fighting to Keep World Sports a Fair Game

April 24, 2012

The New York Times on April 24, 2012 released the following:

“By ROB HUGHES

LYON — In ancient Greek mythology, Hercules had to slay the multiheaded serpent-like Hydra, guardian of the underworld, although each time a head was cut off, two others would grow in its place.

In modern sports, it can seem that the authorities face a similar and equally herculean task in the global fight against illegal sports betting and match-fixing.

Michel Platini, the head of UEFA, the governing body of European soccer, which runs the richest sports club tournament in the world, the Champions League, has called illegal betting the greatest danger to the game, “the one that can kill football.”

Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee, goes even further.

“Sport is in danger,” Rogge said. “It’s not about the Olympics, it’s not about the Games, it’s about sport in general. Illegal betting in sport generates a turnover of around $140 billion a year, and it is inevitable that the Games will be sullied.”

According to the World Lottery Association, an organization of state-authorized lotteries, €90 billion, nearly $120 billion, is spent each year in legitimate wagers on soccer games. The same group estimates that another €90 billion is spent in illegitimate soccer betting. But Interpol, the international police organization, estimates have put the figure much higher.

While the problem of match-fixing in soccer has existed for decades, it appears to have intensified in recent years, aided by the Internet. Concerned by this apparent surge, international soccer authorities and law enforcement officials joined forces last year in their struggle to combat rampant match-fixing by what they describe as sprawling networks of organized crime based in Singapore, Malaysia and elsewhere in Southeast Asia.

FIFA, world soccer’s governing body, pledged $20 million in May 2011 to create a unit within Interpol in Singapore dedicated to rooting out match-fixing in Asia.

Noboru Nakatani, until recently the special adviser to the head of Japan’s National Police Agency, is moving to Singapore this month to oversee the research and development facility.

The unit aims to develop a program for officials, players and administrators that warns against match-fixing and alerts them to how it dishonors the game and might ruin their careers.

Ronald K. Noble, secretary general of Interpol, has said that gambling on sports “might seem as harmless as placing a small bet on your favorite team.”

But these operations, he notes, are often controlled by “organized criminals who frequently engage in loan sharking and use intimidation and violence to collect debts.” He added, “If that doesn’t work, they force their desperate, indebted victims into drug smuggling and into prostitution.”

Rogge has suggested that athletes must be educated about corruption, and that education is needed worldwide to instill knowledge about how and where to prevent the betting and fixing cases that have become prevalent in a number of sports, including soccer, cricket, and even sumo wrestling.

Education is the task that Fred Lord, who spent 10 years on undercover missions to crack covert police corruption in his native Australia, is undertaking at Interpol. His department, the Interpol Integrity in Sports program, is headed by Michaela Ragg, a former German federal police officer, and advises sports bodies on how to spot criminality before it festers and grows.

“I’m not a soccer expert,” Lord said. “My skills were in undercover policing. Policemen aren’t out there looking for match-fixers, they’re looking for terrorists or organized criminals.”

Because behind the so-called sporting corruption, Lord suggests, the authorities often find crime syndicates using sports for anything from money laundering to entrapment.

A key player in the fight against corruption in sports, Interpol, which is based in Lyon, in southern France, does not actually make arrests itself. It acts as a liaison between the law-enforcement agencies of its 190 member countries, providing communications and database assistance. Its data include 140,000 fingerprints, 110,000 DNA samples, 170,000 wanted criminals, and records of 32 million missing passports or ID cards.

But Noble, the Interpol secretary general since 2000, can send advisers to potential trouble spots at the request of member countries, as he did with 60 officers dispatched to assist South African border police in preventing known criminals from entering the country during the 2010 soccer World Cup.

Similarly, while London will police the Olympic Games this summer with the assistance of the British government and Metropolitan Police and the military, Interpol will deploy a team of specialists to help to check the passport details of everyone entering the country through the period of the Games.

Interpol has had some successes against international betting rings, as have other police forces. In recent years, operations involving the police in China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Macao, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam broke up major rings.

In South Korea last month, prosecutors said 16 professional volleyball players and two baseball players had been indicted in connection with match-fixing schemes.

In Italy, officials have made a number of arrests in recent months in connection with an ongoing investigation into match-fixing and illegal betting on soccer games. Several players have been among those arrested.

Although this investigation has for now not indicated links to Asian syndicates, the reach and resistance of the Hydra-like criminal networks is extensive and difficult to defeat.

A 2008 double murder in Newcastle, England, is a case in point. A young man and young woman, former university students from China, were murdered. The throat of Zhen Xing Yang was cut; the skull of his girlfriend, Xi Zhou, was smashed in three places. Before he died, investigators said, Yang was tortured.

The convicted murderer, an illegal immigrant from China named Guang Hui Cao, refused to give a motive for his crime. But detectives unearthed evidence that the victims were both involved with an Asian gambling ring that was relying on advance tips to bet on English soccer matches.

The two victims had apparently been recruiters acting for a Chinese syndicate that bet heavily on minor-league soccer games in the north of England. By exploiting a time lapse of one or two minutes between the play and the satellite broadcast in Asia, the police testified, the syndicate could place a winning bet on the next goal, throw-in, corner or free kick before they appeared to happen.

The culprit was arrested and sentenced to more than 30 years in prison. British detectives found no evidence linking him to soccer betting, but they did uncover plenty to implicate the victims. They have since said that, for want of resources, they have had to close the case.

Detectives had visited China but ran up against a wall of silence. The murderer maintains his silence behind bars, and some residents of Newcastle maintain theirs, too. Journalists and investigators of corruption in sports in general have often encountered a similar silence, even from informants hired to advise sports at the highest levels.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Henry Banda Added to Interpol Red Notice List

April 4, 2012

Times of Zambia on April 4, 2012 released the following:

“Henry Banda Now On Interpol List

FORMER republican president, Rupiah Banda’s son, Henry, has now been placed on the International Police (Interpol) website as a wanted person.

According to the Interpol website which is managed by its headquarters in France, notice has been issued to all the 190 member-countries for the arrest of Henry Chikomeni Banda, 44.

Henry is wanted by the Zambia Police Service to answer allegations of corruption relating to the sale of Zamtel to Lap Green Networks of Libya.

According to the Interpol website, Henry was born on August 19, 1967 in Washington DC in the United States.

Interpol says Henry is wanted for suspected fraud.

“If you have any information please contact your national or local police,” stated the notice which has been issued by the general secretariat of Interpol in Lyon.

There have been conflicting reports about the whereabouts of Henry with some media reports stating that he was in Kenya or South Africa.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Italy’s head of criminal police visits INTERPOL ahead of Rome General Assembly

January 16, 2012

INTERPOL on January 16, 2012 released the following:

“LYON, France – Italy’s Director General of Criminal Police and Deputy Director General of Public Security, Prefect Francesco Cirillo, today met with INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat headquarters to discuss security measures aimed at enhancing international cooperation against cross-border crime.

With Rome hosting the 81st INTERPOL General Assembly later this year (5-8 November), the visit by Prefect Cirillo provided an opportunity to review preparations for the conference which will cover key security issues such as transnational organized crime, human and drug trafficking, terrorism, corruption, cybercrime and stolen works of art.

The role of international law enforcement cooperation and the global tools and services INTERPOL provides its 190 member countries against international crime will top the conference agenda.

During his meeting with Prefect Cirillo, Secretary General Noble underlined Italy’s ‘strong leadership’ in international law enforcement cooperation, and said INTERPOL’s General Assembly in Rome was set to determine the international security agenda ‘at a time when globalization has seen the expansion and diversification of transnational crime’.

The General Assembly is composed of delegates appointed by the governments of member countries. As INTERPOL’s supreme governing body, it meets once a year and takes all the major decisions affecting general policy, the resources needed for international cooperation, working methods, finances and programmes of activities. It also elects the Organization’s Executive Committee. Each member country represented has one vote.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Gaddafi son denies Interpol allegations

October 3, 2011

The Times of India on October 3, 2011 released the following:

“TRIPOLI: Muammar Gaddafi’s son, al-Saadi, denied allegations of corruption and intimidation and called Interpol’s decision to put him on the equivalent of its most-wanted list political, according to an email.

Al-Saadi Gaddafi is under house arrest in Libyan neighbor Niger, where he fled after Tripoli fell to revolutionary forces. His father and two of his brothers are in hiding, presumably inside Libya, as fighting between revolutionary forces and Gaddafi loyalists continues on three fronts.

Al-Saadi “regrets the issue of a red notice by Interpol and strenuously denies the charges made against him,” an email forwarded Sunday to The Associated Press said.

Interpol issued a red notice for al-Saadi last week based on accusations he misappropriated property and engaged in “armed intimidation” when he headed the Libyan Football Federation. He also was a special forces commander and is the subject of UN sanctions for commanding military units involved in repression of demonstrations.

The international police agency said the notice was issued in response to a request by the Libya’s National Transitional Council, which has assumed leadership of the North African nation. Niger, which borders Libya on the south and long benefited from Gaddafi’s largesse, has said it would study the question.

In the email, al-Saadi called the Interpol notice a “clear political decision to recognize the de jure authority of the National Transitional Council taken without appropriate regard to the current absence of a functioning, effective and fair system of justice in Libya.”

It said al-Saadi “worked tirelessly to promote football in Libya, priding himself on the fact that Libya was formerly selected to host the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations.” It added that Gaddafi’s son “continues to call on all sides to seek a negotiated and peaceful resolution to the present conflict.”

The South African Football Association has signed an agreement with Libya’s post-Gaddafi football federation to host the 2013 African Cup of Nations, while Libya will stage the 2017 games.

The email was relayed to the AP on Sunday by defense attorney Nick Kaufman, who has been involved in a number of international criminal cases. Kaufman said he was contacted by an intermediary he identified as al-Saadi’s press secretary, Jackie Frazier.

Al-Saadi fled to Niger in mid-September along with several other regime loyalists, including some generals.

Interpol also has issued red notices for Muammar Gaddafi and his son Seif al-Islam upon request by the Hague-based International Criminal Court. Both men have been charged with crimes against humanity.

Interpol had urged authorities in Niger and surrounding countries — and those with direct flights to Niger — to watch out for and arrest Gaddafi “with a view to returning him to Libya” for prosecution.

Interpol’s red notices are the highest-level alerts they can issue to their member countries. The notices do not force countries to turn over suspects but strongly urge them to, and countries who ignore such notices can come under pressure from the international community.

Gadhafi’s eight adult children have played influential roles in Libya, from commanding an elite military unit to controlling the oil sector. Al-Saadi, 38, headed the Libyan Football Federation, and at one point played in Italy’s professional league but spent most of his time on the bench.

Another Gadhafi son is with his daughter Aisha and wife in neighboring Algeria — along with other family members — while Khamis Gaddafi, who led the Khamis Brigade that fought in the west, was reportedly killed in battle, although that was never confirmed.

Libya’s new rulers have gained control of most of the country, but revolutionary forces still face fierce resistance in Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte, Bani Walid and pockets in the southern desert. NATO recent extended its mission, although the top US commander for Africa said Saturday that the military mission is largely complete.

Army Gen Carter Ham, head of US Africa command said that the National Transitional Council and its forces should be in “reasonable control” of population centers before the end of the NATO mission, dubbed Unified Protector. And he said they are close to that now.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Cricket looks to Interpol to help corruption fight

September 29, 2011

The Sacramento Bee on September 29, 2011 released the following:

“By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

LONDON — The International Cricket Council is in talks with Interpol about joining forces to help fight corruption in the sport.

Ronnie Flanagan, chairman of the ICC’s anti-corruption and security unit, told The Associated Press that he hopes the international police agency and his body can “mutually cooperate and work together.”

FIFA recently pledged to pay Interpol $29 million to help soccer crack down on match-fixing.

But speaking on the sideline of a World Sports Law Report conference in London, Flanagan says cricket lacks the funds to pay Interpol.

Even if an agreement with Interpol is signed, Flanagan says “unfortunately, investigations themselves fall back to our unit.””

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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