Sri Lanka seeks help from Interpol on Aust-bound trawler

October 25, 2012

Herald Sun on October 23, 2012 released the following:

“AAP

SRI Lanka’s police have sought help from Interpol to track down a fishing trawler stolen by its own crew in a bid to illegally transport asylum seekers to Australia.

A magistrate issued arrest warrants against the skipper and 13 others who staged a hijacking last week to try to cover up the theft of the boat and use it in the highly lucrative people-smuggling business, a police statement said on Monday.

“Police today sought the assistance of Interpol to execute the arrest warrants against the 14 individuals involved in the robbery of the trawler on October 14,” the statement said.

Police told the magistrate that the skipper of the trawler had stolen the vessel from its owner before taking on board another 10 people in a suspected journey to Australia.

Two out of the six crewmen who were later found bobbing in the water off the island’s southern coast gave conflicting accounts of the events and are being detained for questioning.

The pair had initially told police that the trawler had been attacked by about 40 suspected illegal immigrants carrying swords, who arrived in four small boats and overpowered the crew.

Police said two other trawlers had also been reported missing off the island’s southern region since October 2 and they too could have been stolen for people-smuggling.

Sri Lankan authorities say they have detained over 1000 people who have tried to leave for Australia illegally this year.

Australia hopes the prospect of years in detention on remote Pacific islands will deter asylum seekers from attempting the dangerous sea voyage, which has cost hundreds of lives over the past decade.

Sri Lankans pay up to $US3000 ($A2925) for a place on trawlers which take around two weeks to make the treacherous crossing to Australia.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Interpol ‘red notices’ up 62 percent

January 21, 2012

UPI.com on January 19, 2012 released the following:

“MOSCOW, Jan. 19 (UPI) — The number of “red notices” issued by Interpol rose more than 62 percent in 2011 to 26,000 compared with 2010, Interpol’s chief said Thursday.

Ronald Noble, the chief of the international commission, said red notices, which request the arrest of wanted persons with a goal of extradition, climbed from 16,000 in 2010, RIA Novosti reported.

At the same time, the number of “diffusions” — informal arrest warrants placed on Interpol’s communications system — increased by 15,000, to 49,000, or about 44 percent.

Overall, the number of Interpol notices increased to 75,000, or 50 percent.

In the past 11 years, the number of people wanted by Interpol has increased nearly six-fold.

The operations of Interpol, whose full name is the International Criminal Police Commission, have become much more public, Noble said. In 2000, 95 percent of its notices were issued secretly, compared with fewer than half its notices today.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

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To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol Wanted List Grows 50% in 2011

January 19, 2012

RIA Novosti on January 19, 2012 released the following:

“Interpol’s wanted list increased by 50 percent in 2011, to 75,000 names from 50,000 the previous year, Interpol chief Ronald Noble said on Thursday.

The list currently includes 26,000 suspects who have been issued “red notices,” which stipulates their immediate detention for subsequent extradition, as well as 49,000 issued “diffusions” – informal arrest warrants that are posted on Interpol’s communications system.

The bureau issued 10,000 new “red notices” and 15,000 “diffusions” last year, Noble said.

Over the past 11 years, the number of people wanted by Interpol has seen an almost six-fold increase, he said.

Interpol operations have become more public, Noble said: back in 2000, a total of 95 percent of all Interpol’s notices were issued secretly, while currently, less then half of them are secret.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol issues arrest warrant for five K. Serbs

October 30, 2011

B92.net on October 30, 2011 released the following:

“PRIŠTINA — Interpol has issued an arrest warrant for five Serbs suspected of murdering Kosovo police special unit (ROSU) member Enven Zymberi on July 26.

The warrant, which is published on Interpol’s website, was issued at UNMIK’s request.

Interpol issued the warrant for the arrest of Ratomir Božović, Radovan Radić, Milovan Vlašković, Slobodan Vučinić and Dušan Jovanović.

“UNMIK, as a representative of the UN in Kosovo, has asked Interpol to issue the arrest warrants for these persons. We requested the interpol to publish the names of the suspects after we got the court documentation from EULEX,“ UNMIK Spokesman Olivier Salgado told B92.

Radio Dukagjini has reported that Ratomir Kasalević’s name is not on the Interpol arrest warrant even though he is one of the suspects for the murder of the policeman.

Zymberi was shot and killed during the operation of the Priština authorities aimed at “establishing law and order“ at the Jarinje and Brnjak administrative crossings in northern Kosovo on July 26.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Battle to extradite Rwanda fugitives rages on

October 3, 2011

The East African on October 2, 2011 released the following:

“By A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT, The EastAfrican

Rwanda is coming under renewed global pressure to craft new strategies to arrest wanted genocide suspects from their hide outs ahead of next year’s UN court deadline.

Seventeen years after the 1994 genocide, at least 65 of the key masterminds remain at large despite efforts to track down genocide fugitives.

Concern is mounting ahead of the 2012 deadline when the mandate of the Arusha based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) — the UN court set up to deal with the atrocities — expires.

Nine of the most wanted genocide masterminds remain at large, with a bounty of $5 million each on their head under the US Rewards for Justice Programme since 2004.

Despite the incentive, some of the most wanted suspects remain untouched; notable among them is Felicien Kabuga, an alleged financier of the Rwanda genocide who has been rumoured to be hiding in Kenya.

Only 32 fugitives have been arrested by Interpol out of the over 97 red notices (arrest warrants) issued.

“It’s a huge problem.

They also have access to resources that allow them to hide from capture. But just to remind you; it took 10 years to track down Osama bin Laden,” said Ronald Noble, the Secretary General of Interpol, adding there was a need for a new strategy to fast track the arrest of the fugitives who have become “more elusive.”

“The fugitives usually move under false names and travel documents to evade arrest with 10 genocide suspects so far arrested with false documents,” he said. However, the Interpol chief observed that with increasing regional and cross-border cooperation among countries, progress has been made towards limiting the movements of the fugitives, citing recent arrests of genocide fugitives in Uganda and DRC.

However, Rwanda is on the verge of achieving a major breakthrough as several European countries holding fugitives have finally looked into the possibility of extraditing the suspects to face trial in Rwanda.

Among countries Rwanda has been involved in a long-standing debate with requests to have suspects extradited home are France, Sweden, Norway, Finland, the Netherlands and Denmark.

The argument has been that Rwanda does not have competent courts to accord extradited individuals a fair trial, a claim Rwanda dismisses.

“We have always been ready. Our position is clear, we are ready to take on these cases,” Rwanda’s Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga said.

Several requests, including some to the Arusha-based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), have been turned down in the past on the same grounds. However, earlier this year, some countries including Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden and the ICTR itself, began to give in, agreeing to the argument that Rwanda has made some major reforms in the judiciary and can try some of these cases.

Norway has said it would extradite Charles Bandora, a genocide suspect who roamed several African countries before ending up in the Scandinavian country, but he appealed the decision in the European Human Rights Court (EHRC), which is yet to decide.

The Netherlands on the other hand has appreciated several reforms in the justice sector, some of which it finances, but it is yet to extradite any of the several suspects in Dutch jails. It will all depend on the EHRC.

The same is the case with Sylvere Ahorugeze in Sweden.

But then, just as Rwanda braces itself for the first ever extraditions from a European country, human rights watchdogs including Human Right Watch (HRW), Amnesty International and the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI) are opposing the development. The groups have argued before the Strasbourg-based European court that Rwanda does not yet have a judiciary that is independent enough to accord the fugitives a fair trial.

“In theory, Rwanda is reforming its judiciary, but in practice those measures are still insufficient,” Carina Tertsakian from Human Rights Watch told the International Justice Tribune.

Ms Tertsakian, whose work permit was cancelled in April last year by Rwanda immigration authorities, and the representatives of Amnesty International and CHRI argue that the trials of the suspects risk being “politicised,” once transferred to Rwanda.

Mr Ngoga, however, dismissed the allegations, instead accusing the rights group of attempting to derail a process that was reaching a “promising stage.”

Mr Ngoga insists that organisation such as HRW, which has had a number of run-ins with the Rwandan government and Amnesty International, are determined to frustrate efforts to ensure justice takes its course.

“These organisations are always ready and opportunely present to oppose every initiative that would bring back to Rwanda genocide fugitives,” Mr Ngoga said.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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