“Snowden on the Run”

June 24, 2013

The Wall Street Journal on June 24, 2013 released the following:

By DEVLIN BARRETT in Washington, D.C., and TE-PING CHEN in Hong Kong

“A global cat-and-mouse game involving the admitted leaker of National Security Agency secrets exploded into a diplomatic scramble, as U.S. authorities sought to catch Edward Snowden before he reached his next goal: political asylum in Ecuador.

Mr. Snowden’s unexpected Sunday flight to Moscow from Hong Kong exposed the apparent limits of America’s diplomatic and intelligence-gathering reach. At a time when Mr. Snowden has been the subject of intense interest from U.S. authorities, they were unable to prevent his departure from a jurisdiction generally viewed as friendly to U.S. extradition requests.

Washington had requested Hong Kong arrest Mr. Snowden in anticipation of extradition, and officials including Attorney General Eric Holder had reached out to authorities in the city to urge that request be honored, a U.S. official said. But it wasn’t until Mr. Snowden had left for Moscow that the Americans had found out that Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China, viewed their request as “insufficient,” the official said.

According to people familiar with the case, the U.S. never asked Interpol, the international police agency, to issue a “red notice” for Mr. Snowden, which would have triggered alerts at airports to delay, if not stop outright, his departure.

The White House early Monday said it expects the Russian government to “look at all options available” to expel Mr. Snowden to the U.S. to face charges. The White House National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said the U.S. also registered strong objections to authorities in Hong Kong and China through diplomatic channels over the decision to let Mr. Snowden flee.

Ecuador said it had received a request for asylum from Mr. Snowden, but that no decision had been reached.

The 30-year-old Mr. Snowden, who until May was a government contractor working at an NSA facility in Hawaii, has been hailed as a hero by some civil libertarians on the right and left after he said he disclosed the secrets to prompt a public debate about the NSA’s surveillance practices. But he has begun to draw harsh bipartisan criticism for involvement with countries such as China, Russia and Ecuador, which are at odds with the U.S. on many issues, and with WikiLeaks, a group that has published U.S. secrets in the past. China and Russia also drew barbs from U.S. lawmakers Sunday, raising the prospect of new strains in America’s relations with key powers at a time when President Barack Obama is seeking their help dealing with a host of foreign-policy concerns in places such as Syria, Iran and North Korea.

The Chinese government is almost certain to have approved Hong Kong’s decision to let Mr. Snowden leave because it pertains to national security and foreign relations, according to diplomats, analysts and Hong Kong legislators.

News of Mr. Snowden’s departure from Hong Kong fueled conflicting reports during the day of where he might be headed, and it sent a horde of journalists rushing to Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport to await his expected arrival at a Soviet-era terminal.

No images surfaced of Mr. Snowden exiting Aeroflot flight 213 from Hong Kong. But an airport spokeswoman confirmed late Sunday that he was in the airport’s “transit zone”—where passengers await connecting flights to other countries. Passengers arriving in Moscow from abroad don’t need to have a Russian visa if they are booked on a connecting flight and stay within that zone.

Passengers on Mr. Snowden’s reported flight from Hong Kong said those on board the plane disembarked via a staircase on the runway rather than via a passenger walkway, which is unusual for big international arrivals. Two business-class passengers said they saw cars meet the plane, one of them a black-windowed, black sedan.

Russian media later reported that Mr. Snowden underwent a medical exam and was taken to a hotel inside the transit area.

The day was marked by a flurry of diplomatic and law-enforcement maneuvering, with U.S. authorities saying they had revoked Mr. Snowden’s passport and asking other countries not to harbor him. State Department spokeswoman Jennifer Psaki said Mr. Snowden “should not be allowed to proceed in any further international travel, other than is necessary to return him to the United States.”

Mr. Obama was getting updates from national-security aides on Mr. Snowden’s travels, according to a senior administration official.

Mr. Snowden had traveled to Hong Kong from Hawaii on May 20, taking with him secret information detailing the government’s mass collection of Americans’ telephone-call records and its Internet surveillance program called Prism. That information formed the basis of articles in the Guardian and Washington Post newspapers that spurred intense public debate about U.S. surveillance methods.

A person familiar with Mr. Snowden’s case said his decision to get on a flight to Moscow was “very sudden,” made only in the day before departing. The decision was made in consultation with WikiLeaks, which encouraged Mr. Snowden to leave the city after communicating with others about his options abroad, the person said.

“He is very independent, but also very willing to listen to advice,” the person said, adding that Mr. Snowden was concerned that any further delay would result in his detainment by Hong Kong authorities. In part, Mr. Snowden’s determination to leave Hong Kong was based on the fear of losing access to the Internet—his vital link to the rest of the world—should he be detained, the person said. In part, Mr. Snowden’s determination to leave Hong Kong was based on the fear of losing access to the Internet—his vital link to the rest of the world—should he be detained, the person said.

At no point was Mr. Snowden questioned or detained by Hong Kong authorities, the person said, and neither was he told by local authorities to leave the city. The decision to get on a plane to Moscow was made independently by Mr. Snowden, the person said: “It seemed that time was of the essence.”

One American official said the U.S. had privately requested on June 15 that Hong Kong authorities provisionally arrest Mr. Snowden in anticipation of extradition. Two days later, Hong Kong authorities acknowledged receiving the request and said the matter was under review, the U.S. official said. This past Friday, Hong Kong asked for additional details about the charges and the evidence, according to the official. U.S. officials say they were responding to that request when they learned Hong Kong had allowed him to leave.

Jacques Semmelman, an extradition lawyer in New York, said U.S. officials “were double-crossed” by Hong Kong. “I find it inconceivable that the U.S. didn’t meet the standard, because the standard is very easy to meet,” he said.

A Hong Kong government spokesman Monday echoed a previous statement from the government, saying that, “according to the law, any persons who lawfully stay in Hong Kong, unless prohibited by law, shall be free to leave Hong Kong.”

Meanwhile, observers in Hong Kong said a prolonged legal battle over Mr. Snowden’s extradition in Hong Kong could have heightened U.S. pressure on Beijing and left Chinese authorities with few good choices.

“It’s good for Hong Kong and Beijing to get rid of this hot potato,” said James Sung, political scientist at City University of Hong Kong, adding that Mr. Snowden’s departure is a “relief for both Hong Kong and Beijing.”

The departure drew mixed reviews among the city’s lawmakers. “He has abandoned Hong Kong and that’s somewhat sad,” said legislator Claudia Mo. “Personally, I think Snowden owes Hong Kong people an explanation.” Ms. Mo was among the hundreds who rallied to support Mr. Snowden earlier this month, calling on Hong Kong to resist any U.S. request for his surrender.

“For Hong Kong, this was the best option,” said Regina Ip, the city’s former security secretary and a current legislator. She added that the city might not have had any other choice.

WikiLeaks, best known for publicizing a trove of secret U.S. government cables provided by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, said it was helping Mr. Snowden on his travel from Hong Kong to Russia and Ecuador. Whether Mr. Snowden will make it to South America was unclear late Sunday. The lack of a valid passport isn’t in itself enough to force the Russians to turn Mr. Snowden over to U.S. authorities.

Russia’s Interfax News Agency said Mr. Snowden was booked on a flight from Moscow to Cuba. There are no direct flights from Moscow to Ecuador.

Previously, Russian officials had said they would consider an asylum request from Mr. Snowden, if he made one.

Last year, Ecuador granted asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Mr. Snowden has been charged in a criminal complaint with theft of U.S. government property, unauthorized communication of national defense information and willful communication of classified communications intelligence information. The last two charges are espionage-related, which complicated the matter.

The U.S. could have sought an Interpol red notice—the equivalent of an arrest warrant sent to its 190 member countries. But under Interpol guidelines, espionage charges are considered political, and the organization isn’t permitted to get involved in a matter of a military, political, racial or religious nature, an Interpol official said.

Douglas McNabb, a veteran extradition lawyer based in Washington, D.C., said if officials had charged Mr. Snowden initially with just the theft of government property, they could have tied Mr. Snowden down in Hong Kong, while U.S. prosecutors built a stronger case and negotiated with local authorities over possible additional charges.

“They could have gone the safe route, charged him with the theft, and then once you have him detained, they could then indict him,” said Mr. McNabb. “I think somebody dropped the ball. I think it was poorly done.”

A U.S. official said they didn’t seek a red notice on Mr. Snowden because the government was already negotiating with Hong Kong, and the charges had been sealed.

On a day when U.S. authorities were forced to react to the high-profile gamesmanship of Mr. Snowden, politicians in the U.S. could do little but vent their frustration at Russia and China.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.) said Mr. Snowden’s choice of countries undercuts his claims to be defending privacy and freedom.

“The freedom trail is not exactly China, Russia, Cuba, Venezuela. So I hope we’ll chase him to the ends of the earth, bring him to justice and let the Russians know there will be consequences if they harbor this guy,” Mr. Graham told Fox News.

Nanda Chitre, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Justice Department, said the agency will “pursue relevant law enforcement cooperation with other countries where Mr. Snowden may be attempting to travel.””

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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Sri Lanka seeks help from Interpol on Aust-bound trawler

October 25, 2012

Herald Sun on October 23, 2012 released the following:

“AAP

SRI Lanka’s police have sought help from Interpol to track down a fishing trawler stolen by its own crew in a bid to illegally transport asylum seekers to Australia.

A magistrate issued arrest warrants against the skipper and 13 others who staged a hijacking last week to try to cover up the theft of the boat and use it in the highly lucrative people-smuggling business, a police statement said on Monday.

“Police today sought the assistance of Interpol to execute the arrest warrants against the 14 individuals involved in the robbery of the trawler on October 14,” the statement said.

Police told the magistrate that the skipper of the trawler had stolen the vessel from its owner before taking on board another 10 people in a suspected journey to Australia.

Two out of the six crewmen who were later found bobbing in the water off the island’s southern coast gave conflicting accounts of the events and are being detained for questioning.

The pair had initially told police that the trawler had been attacked by about 40 suspected illegal immigrants carrying swords, who arrived in four small boats and overpowered the crew.

Police said two other trawlers had also been reported missing off the island’s southern region since October 2 and they too could have been stolen for people-smuggling.

Sri Lankan authorities say they have detained over 1000 people who have tried to leave for Australia illegally this year.

Australia hopes the prospect of years in detention on remote Pacific islands will deter asylum seekers from attempting the dangerous sea voyage, which has cost hundreds of lives over the past decade.

Sri Lankans pay up to $US3000 ($A2925) for a place on trawlers which take around two weeks to make the treacherous crossing to Australia.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition Defense, OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal, International Criminal Court Defense, and US Seizure of Non-Resident, Foreign-Owned Assets. Because we have experience dealing with INTERPOL, our firm understands the inter-relationship that INTERPOL’s “Red Notice” brings to this equation.

The author of this blog is Douglas C. McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

————————————————————–

International criminal defense questions, but want to be anonymous?

Free Skype Tel: +1.202.470.3427, OR

Free Skype call:

           Office Locations

Email:


Former Judge Romano on Interpol’s ‘Wanted’ list

December 19, 2011

Buenos Aires Herald on December 19, 2011 released the following:

“Interpol issued an arrest warrant against former Argentine Judge Otilio Roque Romano, who fled to Chile after being accused of having connection to crimes against humanity during the last military dictatorship.

Romano, 68-years-old, currently appears in the international organization’s website in the Wanted list of “crimes against humanity.”

During a rally held in Mendoza last Friday, President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner announced that the national government would ask Chile for Romano’s extradition.

Last August, Romano ran to Chile when he was summoned to court over a crimes against humanity investigation.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol seeks West Papuan tribal leader living in UK

November 28, 2011
Benny Wenda
Benny Wenda was issued with a red notice by Interpol at the request of the Indonesians

BBC News UK on November 24, 2011 released the following:

By Danny Shaw
Home affairs correspondent, BBC News

A tribal leader from an Indonesian province who has been granted asylum in the UK has been named on an Interpol wanted list, the BBC has learned.

Benny Wenda, who is 36 and living in Oxford, leads a movement for the independence of West Papua.

Indonesia wants to put him on trial for several offences he is alleged to have committed before he left, including murder and arson.

Mr Wenda said the charges were “made up” and politically motivated.

Charles Foster, a lawyer who is supporting Mr Wenda, said the move by the Indonesian authorities was designed to stop Mr Wenda arguing his case for independence.

West Papua is an Indonesian province on the western tip of the island of New Guinea.

Mr Foster said: “It’s plainly affecting his ability to go around the world, doing the job which he set himself and his people have set him, which is saying to Indonesia ‘you have an obligation to have a free and fair election in West Papua and that the continued annexation of West Papua, Indonesia, is illegal under international law’.”

The government accepted Mr Wenda’s asylum application in 2002 after hearing allegations he had been persecuted by the Indonesian authorities.

‘Riddled with corruption’

Mr Wenda had been arrested for his alleged involvement in an attack on a police station.

He claimed that during his detention he was held in appalling conditions and threatened and beaten by prison guards and intelligence officers, who had tried to kill him. His subsequent trial was said by an observer to be “riddled with corruption”.

However, Mr Wenda managed to escape from the country and fled to the UK, eventually settling in Oxford with his wife and six children, and was granted British citizenship.

It has now emerged that earlier this year he was issued with a red notice by Interpol at the request of the Indonesians.

A red notice acts as an alert to Interpol’s 190 member countries that an individual is wanted by another country.

Anyone subject to it can be arrested and is liable to be extradited.

In Mr Wenda’s case, Interpol said the red notice was issued by Papua Regional Police CID for “crimes involving the use of weapons/explosives”.

“When I saw this it really made me scared,” Mr Wenda told BBC News.

This is Indonesia watching me, even here. That was shocking me you know”

Mr Foster said travelling outside the UK would in future be “risky” for Mr Wenda.

“Whenever he goes across a border his name is likely to flash up on the screen of the immigration officials and he’s likely to be ushered into a little room for questioning,” he said.

“Of course, the politics of that country will determine to some extent what happens after that.”

‘Peaceful campaigner’
An Indonesian Embassy official said Mr Wenda belonged to a “clandestine organisation dedicated to secede from Indonesia using any means available to them” and was wanted on suspicion of offences including murder and arson.

Billy Wibisono, Third Secretary (Information and Socio-Cultural Affairs), said: “Mr Wenda and several other accomplices participated in an attack of the Abepura Police Station on 7 December 2000 and caused the deaths and destruction of property.”

He said six police officers and civilians died in the attack, and that several government buildings and other premises were damaged.

“Weapons, firearms and munitions were stolen from the police station,” Mr Wibisono said, adding that the red notice would be withdrawn if Mr Wenda “can prove his innocence in our court of law”.

Mr Wenda said the allegations were “completely made up” and that he had always been a peaceful campaigner for independence.

“I was not even in the country at the time and Indonesia could not find a single independent witness against me. It is these political-motivated charges that meant the UK gave me asylum but, years later, Indonesia is still threatening me with them,” he said.

Jago Russell, Chief Executive of Fair Trials International, which is backing Mr Wenda, is calling on Interpol to withdraw the red notice.

“There are a number of countries which are using Interpol red notices against political opponents, or freedom fighters, so clearly Indonesia is in the case of Benny Wenda,” said Mr Russell.

He said red notices had been issued on behalf of the Syrian and Iranian authorities and that Colonel Gaddafi used the scheme in Libya.

“There certainly is a pattern of it having been used for political purposes even though it is expressly stated in the constitution of Interpol that that’s not what it should be used for,” he said.

Interpol refused to comment on Mr Wenda’s case but released a statement saying that red notices were issued only when details of a valid arrest warrant were provided by the requesting country.

“Interpol’s role is not to question allegations against an individual, nor to gather evidence, so a red notice is issued based on a presumption that the information provided by the police is accurate and relevant,” it said.

The agency added red notices would be withdrawn where the information provided was insufficient or “not convincing”.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


FICAC works with Interpol for arrest of Nemani

November 17, 2011

FijiVillage.com on November 15, 2011 released the following:

“An arrest warrant is expected to be issued to Interpol in New Zealand against the former Deputy General Manager of the Fiji National Provident Fund, Foana Nemani.

Nemani who is currently in New Zealand is charged with Olota Rokovunisei for allegedly authorizing payments for responsibility allowance to each other for the sum of $35,911.00 and $33,333.00 respectively without authorization of the Higher Salaries Commission or the FNPF Board.

FICAC Prosecutor, Shalini Sanmogam made a submission in court today that FICAC is working with Interpol for the arrest of Nemani.

The court will hear the progress of the arrest on the 20th of February next year.

It is understood that FICAC tried to ascertain the whereabouts of Nemani through the assistance of other law enforcement agencies.

Story by: Tokasa Rainima and Gwen McGoon”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol issues arrest warrant for five K. Serbs

October 30, 2011

B92.net on October 30, 2011 released the following:

“PRIŠTINA — Interpol has issued an arrest warrant for five Serbs suspected of murdering Kosovo police special unit (ROSU) member Enven Zymberi on July 26.

The warrant, which is published on Interpol’s website, was issued at UNMIK’s request.

Interpol issued the warrant for the arrest of Ratomir Božović, Radovan Radić, Milovan Vlašković, Slobodan Vučinić and Dušan Jovanović.

“UNMIK, as a representative of the UN in Kosovo, has asked Interpol to issue the arrest warrants for these persons. We requested the interpol to publish the names of the suspects after we got the court documentation from EULEX,“ UNMIK Spokesman Olivier Salgado told B92.

Radio Dukagjini has reported that Ratomir Kasalević’s name is not on the Interpol arrest warrant even though he is one of the suspects for the murder of the policeman.

Zymberi was shot and killed during the operation of the Priština authorities aimed at “establishing law and order“ at the Jarinje and Brnjak administrative crossings in northern Kosovo on July 26.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


ICC seeks forensic proof of death before withdrawing Gaddafi arrest warrant

October 24, 2011

Guardian on October 21, 2011 released the following:

By: Julian Borger

“International criminal court turns its attention to pursuing other Libyan regime members

The international criminal court has said it would not withdraw its arrest warrant for Muammar Gaddafi until it has forensic proof that he is dead.

In practice, the ICC and Interpol changed the focus of their attention to the two other regime members facing arrest warrants for crimes against humanity: Gaddafi’s son, Seif al-Islam, and his intelligence chief, Abdullah al-Senussi, whose whereabouts were the subject of conflicting reports.

An ICC spokesman, Fadi El-Abdallah, said that some form of DNA evidence taken from Gaddafi’s body would probably be necessary to close the case, and it was up to the new authorities in Tripoli to provide that evidence to the court.

As one possible precedent, he mentioned the case of Raska Lukwiya, a commander of the rebel Lords Resistance Army in Uganda indicted for war crimes and crimes against humanity in 2005, who was killed in combat in 2007. His identity was confirmed by the help of Dutch forensic scientists.

In the case of Libya, the National Transitional Council had vowed to try Gaddafi and members of his regime inside the country, but there were some reports yesterday that at least one other ICC suspect, Senussi, had fled in Niger. That country’s foreign minister Mohammed Bazoum, has said that his government had been told by unnamed western nations that Senussi had crossed into the sparsely inhabited north of Niger. Other reports said that the intelligence chief, who is also Gaddafi’s brother-in-law, had been captured in Libya.

There were also conflicting accounts over whether Seif al-Islam had been captured, killed or was also trying to leave the country. Interpol appealed for him to turn himself in, and offered to guarantee safe passage to The Hague.

The ICC chief prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, is still investigating claims of atrocities committed in Libya, but officials said it was possible it would look into the circumstances of the deaths of Gaddafi and his Mutassim.”

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Douglas McNabb – McNabb Associates, P.C.’s
INTERPOL Red Notice Removal Lawyers Videos:

INTERPOL Notice Removal

INTERPOL’s Red Notice

————————————————————–

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.


Interpol ‘joins’ hunt for British national suspect in Ella Joy case

October 11, 2011

Sun Star on October 11, 2011 released the following:

“CEBU CITY — With the capture of Bella Ruby Santos, the Cebu Provincial Anti-Criminality Task Force now has its eyes on her boyfriend, British national Ian Charles Griffiths, who is in the United Kingdom.

Santos and Griffiths are the suspects in the abduction and murder of six-year-old Ellah Joy Pique last February.

Governor Gwen Garcia said the International Police (Interpol) is coordinating with the task force.

“They (Interpol) are on the case, especially on the whereabouts of Griffiths,” Garcia said.

According to reports, the 51-year-old Griffiths left the country before authorities could file a case against him.

‘In the loop’

“Really, it shows that, with impunity, they are trying to evade the law. Di man na mahimo (You cannot do that). If you are innocent, why hide from authorities?” the governor said.

NBI agents arrested Santos at the SM MegaMall in Metro Manila last Friday, more than two months after she disappeared when a warrant for her arrest was issued.

“I commend the NBI (National Bureau of Investigation) personnel, with (Special Investigator) Arnel Pura,” Garcia said during a press conference Monday, after visiting NBI Central Visayas Director Edward Villarta and Cebu Provincial Police Office Director Patrocinio Comendador.

“Society is governed by law. Law must prevail in order to secure justice. My heart bled for Ellah Joy,” she said.

She said the NBI regularly informs her of Griffiths’ whereabouts.

The London Evening Standard reported that UK authorities arrested Griffiths last April in connection with the Pique case.

Validation

Under an 1861 UK law, a Briton accused of murder or manslaughter abroad can be tried at home.

Griffiths later posted bail.

According to the paper, Griffiths is believed to be in Southampton, 120 kilometers southwest of London.

The governor said a task force subcommittee is validating the “authenticity” of the informant, who tipped off the NBI about Santos’s whereabouts.

Only then can they turn over the P350,000 cash reward to the informant, she said.

In a related development, Santos arrived at the NBI Central Visayas office Monday afternoon.

The agency will present her to the governor and task force members today, Tuesday, before they return her arrest warrant to the court.”

To find additional global criminal news, please read The Global Criminal Defense Daily.

Douglas McNabb and other members of the U.S. law firm practice and write and/or report extensively on matters involving Federal Criminal Defense, INTERPOL Red Notice Removal, International Extradition and OFAC SDN Sanctions Removal.

The author of this blog is Douglas McNabb. Please feel free to contact him directly at mcnabb@mcnabbassociates.com or at one of the offices listed above.

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